In Focus  

Kinek írjam meg, ha nem neked? Mikor írjam meg, ha nem most?

 

Elutasítás, düh, alkudozás, depresszió, belenyugvás. Azt mondják, ez a haldoklás öt fázisa. Nem tudom, hogy az öngyilkosok is ezeken a stációkon mennek-e keresztül. Nem tudom, hogy aki gyilkossá válni készül, annak a pokol milyen bugyrain kell átmennie. Azt sem tudom, hogy aki nem a szó fizikai értelmében készül a halálra, hanem csupán az identitása egy részét készül levetni, egy ilyen ember is vajon ezeken a fázisokon esik-e át.

Valahol a depresszión túl, a belenyugváson innen írom ezt a szöveget. Haldoklom. Nem a szó fizikai értelmében, de temetni készülök bennem a magyart. Ez a szöveg a hazámmal való végleges szakítás dokumentuma szándékszik lenni, villanófénybe merevített pillanata annak a folyamatnak, ahogy felmondom a hazámmal meglevő kulturális, társadalmi, politikai, de mindenekelőtt sorsközösséget.

Ha innen nézem, haldoklás, kétségbeesett kapaszkodás valamihez, amiről tudom, hogy el kell múlnia. Ha onnan nézem, hidegvérrel, számító kegyetlenséggel elkövetett gyilkosság, az eddigi életem, eddigi lojalitásaim kiirtása, az engem eddig tápláló közösségek szisztematikus leépítése, felszámolása.

Önmagam ellen elkövetett gyilkosság ez a szöveg. Önvédelemből elkövetett öngyilkosság.

Read the rest of this entry »

Between the actual and potential

This short essay explores how the notion of hacktivism changes due to easily accessible, military grade Privacy Enhancing Technologies PETs. Privacy Enhancing Technologies, technological tools which provide anonymous communications and protect users from online surveillance enable new forms of online political activism. Through the short summary of the ad-hoc vigilante group Anonymous, this article describes hacktivism 1.0 as electronic civil disobedience conducted by outsiders. Through the analysis of Wikileaks, the anonymous whistleblowing website, it describes how strong PETs enable the development of hacktivism 2.0, where the source of threat is shifted from outsiders to insiders. Insiders have access to documents with which power can be exposed, and who, by using PETs, can anonymously engage in political action. We also describe the emergence of a third generation of hacktivists who use PETs to disengage and create their own autonomous spaces rather than to engage with power through anonymous whistleblowing.

Read the rest of this entry »

A new book with a chapter of mine is out!

Piracy: Leakages from Modernity

Editors: Martin Fredriksson and James Arvanitakis

Price: $40.00

Published: July 2014

ISBN: 978-1-936117-59-8

 

Buy it!
“Piracy” is a concept that seems everywhere in the contemporary world. From the big screen with the dashing Jack Sparrow, to the dangers off the coast of Somalia; from the claims by the Motion Picture Association of America that piracy funds terrorism, to the political impact of pirate parties in countries like Sweden and Germany. While the spread of piracy provokes responses from the shipping and copyright industries, the reverse is also true: for every new development in capitalist technologies, some sort of “piracy” moment emerges.

This is maybe most obvious in the current ideologisation of Internet piracy where the rapid spread of so called Pirate Parties is developing into a kind of global political movement. While the pirates of Somalia seem a long way removed from Internet pirates illegally downloading the latest music hit or, it is the assertion of this book that such developments indicate a complex interplay between capital flows and relations, late modernity, property rights and spaces of contestation. That is, piracy seems to emerge at specific nodes in capitalist relations that create both blockages and leaks between different social actors.

These various aspects of piracy form the focus for this book, entitled Piracy: Leakages from Modernity. It is meant to be a collection of texts that takes a broad perspective on piracy and attempts to capture the multidimensional impacts of piracy on capitalist society today. The book is edited by James Arvanitakis at the University of Western Sydney and Martin Fredriksson at Linköping University, Sweden.

Table of Contents

Read the rest of this entry »

This is my talk on shadow libraries at re:publica 2014, and the subsequent interview to dctp.tv about the talk. Go check it out!

Looking forward to talking at re:publica in Berlin next week. Come and join me discussing pirate libraries Wednesday from 3pm!

RuNet, the Russian segment of the internet is now the home of the most comprehensive scientific pirate libraries on the net. These sites offer free access to millions of books and tens of millions of journal articles. What factors led to the development of these sites? What are the social, cultural and legal conditions that enable them to operate under hostile legal and political conditions? We dig deep into the history to trace how Soviet censorship, samizdat and book black markets shaped the latest generation of Russian pirate librarians, and analyze their achievements. What is in these archives? Who uses them? How does knowledge flow around the globe due to these peer produced, distributed archives? And how do these low cost operations force to change the publishing industry and the multi-million dollar libraries?

Shadow libraries – pirate archivists | re:publica 2014.

The School of Public Policy at the Central European University organised an excellent forum on how to counter the anti-democratic trends in various countries. The discussion took place the day after Fidesz, the party which is responsible for countless anti-democratic steps in the last 4 years won a landslide victory in the general elections. Though this could have defined the discussion, due to the large number of foreign participants (both on the podium and in the audience) enabled us to move beyond the specifics of the Hungarian situation and address anti-democratic tendencies and counter-strategies from the US via France to the Ukraine.

You should check out the recorded panels, and/or the twitter archive for the amazing contributions by the participants. What I would like to do here is to sum up my arguments in the panel that was addressing the role of digital technologies in the pro-democratic process.

Read the rest of this entry »

Today was a fairly good day. My paper on pirate libraries got accepted to the annual conference of the Society for Economic Research on Copyright Issues, I got invited to a panel at the Rolling Back The Rollback: Spaces & strategies for revival of democracy and open societies in Europe conference organized by the School of Public Policy (SPP) at Central European University, and the European Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights has put me on their list of external experts.

Starting in September, 2012 I was a Fulbright Fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center. In the previous year I asked Charlie Nesson, if he could sponsor my application, and I was extremely honored that he said yes. Among the so many excellent scholars at Berkman I specifically chose Charlie for his efforts in the Tenenbaum case.

 

revolution

I identify myself as a piracy researcher, which has its own drawbacks. Though it clearly states what I do (research piracy), it has the no-no word in it. I’ve done some work on how the word piracy is being used by different groups, and it seems that apart from pirate parties, and the Pirate Bay like folks, there is a universal mistrust of this word. People simply don’t want to get associated with it in any way: most academics and activists are quick to establish that they are not in any way want to be seen as someone condoning piracy. Even if and when they offer supportive arguments for the free exchange of cultural goods, they want to distance themselves from copyright infringement. This is especially true with lawyers and legal scholars, and I think I understand why that is. It would be very difficult to maintain academic credibility in the (american) legal / educational system with a tacit or explicit support shown towards the willful disregard of law in general and the breaking of something seen as a fundamental legal /moral infrastructure in the information society (copyright protection).

Read the rest of this entry »

A jövő szabadsága arról fog szólni, hogy képesek vagyunk-e felügyelni az eszközeinket. Képesek leszünk-e értelmes működési szabályokat felállítani, megvizsgálni és leállítani azokat a programokat, amik futnak rajtuk, hogy az akaratunk őszinte és igaz szolgálói legyenek, ne kémek és árulók, akik bűnözőknek, gengsztereknek és kontrollmániásoknak dolgoznak. Ez a csatát még nem vesztettük el, de meg kell nyernünk a szerzői jogi háborút, hogy az internet és a PC szabad és nyitott maradhasson. – Cory Doctorow 28. CCC konferencián elhangzott előpadásának magyar fordítása

A jövő szabadsága arról fog szólni, hogy képesek vagyunk-e felügyelni az eszközeinket. Képesek leszünk-e értelmes működési szabályokat felállítani, megvizsgálni és leállítani azokat a programokat, amik futnak rajtuk, hogy az akaratunk őszinte és igaz szolgálói legyenek, ne kémek és árulók, akik bűnözőknek, gengsztereknek és kontrollmániásoknak dolgoznak. Ez a csatát még nem vesztettük el, de meg kell nyernünk a szerzői jogi háborút, hogy az internet és a PC szabad és nyitott maradhasson. – Cory Doctorow 28. CCC konferencián elhangzott előpadásának magyar fordítása

Read the rest of this entry »

Ez a Trianon-poszt kapcsán támadt felhördülés elgondolkodtatott. Elgondolkodtatott például azon, hogy ha tényleg, ennyien azt gondolják, hogy nem vagyok (igazi) magyar, mert nem fáj Trianon, és én sem azt tartom magamban legfontosabbnak tulajdonságnak, hogy magyar vagyok, hanem azt, hogy kíváncsi, nyitott, racionális, szabad és független, akkor mi az, ami mégis ideköt. Ha ideköt bármi egyáltalán.

Ez a Trianon-poszt kapcsán támadt felhördülés elgondolkodtatott. Elgondolkodtatott például azon, hogy ha tényleg, ennyien azt gondolják, hogy nem vagyok (igazi) magyar, mert nem fáj Trianon, és én sem azt tartom magamban legfontosabbnak tulajdonságnak, hogy magyar vagyok, hanem azt, hogy kíváncsi, nyitott, racionális, szabad és független, akkor mi az, ami mégis ideköt. Ha ideköt bármi egyáltalán.

Read the rest of this entry »

Interesting times indeed. I got caught up in politics. Even abroad it was difficult to miss the troubles in Hungary: controversial new laws enacted, new constitution, economic crises, heavy critique from the US and the EU, mass protests in Budapest.

Source: http://naplo-online.hu/nagyitas/20110421_civilek_alaptorveny_alairasa_ellen/printIt all started a year ago, when I was invited to speak at a rally against the than newly adopted media law which coupled a heavily centralized, and politically charged media authority with unprecedented power of this authority over all kinds of media.

The organizer was a Facebook group called One Million for the Press Freedom in Hungary. By now a 100.000 strong group, it has quickly broadened its scope to protect all kinds of freedom rights, and mutated into a media outlet besides organizing mass protests on March 15th and October 23rd.

I am now one of the spokespersons of the group. I was elected to be amongst the informal leaders of the 40-something people who are actively involved in the organization. I am one of the editors of the Facebook page which organizes debates, pushes underreported news, disseminates information on the civil society protests to hundreds of thousands 2-3 times every day.

I wish I could go back to the library and work on my new project, but these are desperate times, and I realized my responsibility in the future of my country which has been officially been ceased to be a Republic.

 

What are we doing now?

Interesting times indeed. I got caught up in politics. Even abroad it was difficult to miss the troubles in Hungary: controversial new laws enacted, new constitution, economic crises, heavy critique from the US and the EU, mass protests in Budapest.

Source: http://naplo-online.hu/nagyitas/20110421_civilek_alaptorveny_alairasa_ellen/printIt all started a year ago, when I was invited to speak at a rally against the than newly adopted media law which coupled a heavily centralized, and politically charged media authority with unprecedented power of this authority over all kinds of media.

The organizer was a Facebook group called One Million for the Press Freedom in Hungary. By now a 100.000 strong group, it has quickly broadened its scope to protect all kinds of freedom rights, and mutated into a media outlet besides organizing mass protests on March 15th and October 23rd.

I am now one of the spokespersons of the group. I was elected to be amongst the informal leaders of the 40-something people who are actively involved in the organization. I am one of the editors of the Facebook page which organizes debates, pushes underreported news, disseminates information on the civil society protests to hundreds of thousands 2-3 times every day.

I wish I could go back to the library and work on my new project, but these are desperate times, and I realized my responsibility in the future of my country which has been officially been ceased to be a Republic.

 

What are we doing now?

First and foremost we run this independent media. We are also busy organizing the March 15th protest, which is hard, because the authorities have occupied all the public spaces in Budapest. We run a campaign to find an alternative to the current president of Hungary, who is plagued by well founded allegations of plagiarism. We also host a public debate on the contents of a new social contract – a must where nearly 60% of the electorate cannot name a party for which s/he would be willing to vote for.

I am afraid of repercussions. But I don’t have any other choice but to go forward.

 

Take care,

 

b.-

 

Interviews I gave to the Hungarian and international media:

Read the rest of this entry »

I am proud drafter and signee of the Washington Declaration on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest.

Time is of the essence. The last 25 years have seen an unprecedented expansion of the concentrated legal authority exercised by intellectual property rights holders. This expansion has been driven by governments in the developed world and by international organizations that have adopted the maximization of intellectual property control as a fundamental policy tenet. Increasingly, this vision has been exported to the rest of the world.

Over the same period, broad coalitions of civil society groups and developing country governments have emerged to promote more balanced approaches to intellectual property protection. These coalitions have supported new initiatives to promote innovation and creativity, taking advantage of the opportunities offered by new technologies. So far, however, neither the substantial risks of intellectual property maximalism, nor the benefits of more open approaches, are adequately understood by most policy makers or citizens. This must change if the notion of a public interest distinct from the dominant private interest is to be maintained.

The next decade is likely to be determinative. A quarter century of adverse changes in the international intellectual property system are on the cusp of becoming effectively irreversible, at least in the lives of present generations. Intellectual property can promote innovation, creativity and cultural development. But an old proverb teaches that “it is possible to have too much of a good thing,” and that adage certainly applies here. The burden falls on public interest advocates to make a coordinated, evidence-based case for a critical reexamination of intellectual property maximalism at every level of government, and in every appropriate institutional setting, as well as to pursue alternatives that may blunt the force of intellectual property expansionism.

See the full text here.I am proud drafter and signee of the Washington Declaration on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest.

Time is of the essence. The last 25 years have seen an unprecedented expansion of the concentrated legal authority exercised by intellectual property rights holders. This expansion has been driven by governments in the developed world and by international organizations that have adopted the maximization of intellectual property control as a fundamental policy tenet. Increasingly, this vision has been exported to the rest of the world.

Over the same period, broad coalitions of civil society groups and developing country governments have emerged to promote more balanced approaches to intellectual property protection. These coalitions have supported new initiatives to promote innovation and creativity, taking advantage of the opportunities offered by new technologies. So far, however, neither the substantial risks of intellectual property maximalism, nor the benefits of more open approaches, are adequately understood by most policy makers or citizens. This must change if the notion of a public interest distinct from the dominant private interest is to be maintained.

The next decade is likely to be determinative. A quarter century of adverse changes in the international intellectual property system are on the cusp of becoming effectively irreversible, at least in the lives of present generations. Intellectual property can promote innovation, creativity and cultural development. But an old proverb teaches that “it is possible to have too much of a good thing,” and that adage certainly applies here. The burden falls on public interest advocates to make a coordinated, evidence-based case for a critical reexamination of intellectual property maximalism at every level of government, and in every appropriate institutional setting, as well as to pursue alternatives that may blunt the force of intellectual property expansionism.

See the full text here.

I am at the Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest. I am in two panels and leading a third, so it will be a busy week ahead. Check out the program.

We want to propose that an understanding of the control mechanisms within networks needs to be as polydimensional as networks are themselves.

Galloway, A. R., & Thacker, E. (2007). The exploit : a theory of networks. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

For this seventh Media in Transition conference, we focus directly on our core topic – the experience of transition.

Has the digital age confirmed and exponentially increased the cultural instability and creative destruction that are often said to define advanced capitalism? Does living in a digital age mean we may live and die in what the novelist Thomas Pynchon has called “a ceaseless spectacle of transition”? The nearly limitless range of design options and communication choices available now and in the future is both exhilarating and challenging, inciting innovation and creativity but also false starts, incompatible systems, planned obsolescence. How are we coping with the instability of platforms?

I will talk about:

Informal Media Economies – What Can We Learn from the Pirates of Yesteryear?, Bodo Balazs
A longer historical lens suggests that the current crisis of copyright, piracy, and enforcement has much in common with earlier periods of conflict among the different participants of the cultural ecosystem. From the early days of the book trade in the 16th century, cultural markets were shaped by several, competing forces: the Crown’s and the Church’s will to control the flow of ideas, publishers’ need to limit competition among themselves, the authors’ need for financial and political independence and the public’s want for cheap and easily accessible print materials. Several, often overlapping formal and informal arrangements have existed between these stakeholders to regulate the cultural field. One of the informal forces that shape cultural markets is what we call piracy. Piracy is the informal network of producers, distributors and sellers that operate beyond the formally regulated economy. The term piracy suggests illegality, but we stress on the informality of these networks, which include a wide variety of practices from the plainly illegal to those that are consciously opt not to rely on the formal regulatory structures to organize themselves. Informal economies are indeed alternatives to formally organized economies, and this alternativity is usually seen as a threat. I, however, would like to argue, that informal networks, piracy included, are not simply threats, but also offer opportunities to improve on formalized structures. This article argues that 300 years after the first formal copyright regulation, formal instruments regulating the production and flow of intellectual properties are still only one, out of many more-or-less formal arrangements that shape cultural markets.For this seventh Media in Transition conference, we focus directly on our core topic – the experience of transition.

Has the digital age confirmed and exponentially increased the cultural instability and creative destruction that are often said to define advanced capitalism? Does living in a digital age mean we may live and die in what the novelist Thomas Pynchon has called “a ceaseless spectacle of transition”? The nearly limitless range of design options and communication choices available now and in the future is both exhilarating and challenging, inciting innovation and creativity but also false starts, incompatible systems, planned obsolescence. How are we coping with the instability of platforms?

I will talk about:

Informal Media Economies – What Can We Learn from the Pirates of Yesteryear?, Bodo Balazs
A longer historical lens suggests that the current crisis of copyright, piracy, and enforcement has much in common with earlier periods of conflict among the different participants of the cultural ecosystem. From the early days of the book trade in the 16th century, cultural markets were shaped by several, competing forces: the Crown’s and the Church’s will to control the flow of ideas, publishers’ need to limit competition among themselves, the authors’ need for financial and political independence and the public’s want for cheap and easily accessible print materials. Several, often overlapping formal and informal arrangements have existed between these stakeholders to regulate the cultural field. One of the informal forces that shape cultural markets is what we call piracy. Piracy is the informal network of producers, distributors and sellers that operate beyond the formally regulated economy. The term piracy suggests illegality, but we stress on the informality of these networks, which include a wide variety of practices from the plainly illegal to those that are consciously opt not to rely on the formal regulatory structures to organize themselves. Informal economies are indeed alternatives to formally organized economies, and this alternativity is usually seen as a threat. I, however, would like to argue, that informal networks, piracy included, are not simply threats, but also offer opportunities to improve on formalized structures. This article argues that 300 years after the first formal copyright regulation, formal instruments regulating the production and flow of intellectual properties are still only one, out of many more-or-less formal arrangements that shape cultural markets.

I cordially invite you to the XVIII. International Book Festival, to the launch of my first book ‘Copyright Pirates’. The launch will take place on the 15th of Aprin, 3 PM in the Osztovits Levente hall.

The event will be in English!

. Szeretnélek benneteket meghívni a könyvbemutatómra április 15-én a nemzetközi Könyvfesztiválra, ahol a Szerzői jog kalózai című könyvemnek (http://www.typotex.hu/konyv/aszerzoijogkalozai) lesz több bemutatója is.

Aki a könyvtárosokat szereti azt 10.30-ra várom a Fogadó épület galériájába, ahol a szerzői jogi törvény könyvtárakban való gyakorlati alkalmazásáról lesz szó Fodor Klaudia Franciskával (Artisjus) és Fonyó Istvánnéval (BME OMIKK).

A hivatalos esemény pedig délután 3-kor lesz az Osztovits Levente teremben.

Állófogadás, pezsgő, a kalóz pdf-ek dedikálása, fun!

Wikileaks represents a new type of (h)activism, which shifts the source of potential threat from a few, dangerous hackers and a larger group of mostly harmless activists — both outsiders to an organization — to those who are on the inside. For insiders trying to smuggle information out, anonymity is a necessary condition for participation. Wikileaks has demonstrated that the access to anonymity can be democratized, made simple and user friendly.

Read the rest of this entry »

Barátaim!

Az igazat megvallva én örülök a mostani médiatörvénynek. Örülök neki, mert elkezdődött végre a beszélgetés arról, hogy mire is való a média, hogyan is működik az internet korában, milyen állapotban van a magyar sajtó, és hogyan lehetne a negyedik hatalmi ágat jobbá tenni. Őszintén szólva örülök a magánnyugdíjpénztárak államosításának is, mert így nem csak a magántulajdonról kell mindannyiunknak elgondolkodnunk, de arról is, hogy érdemes-e az államra bízni a jövőbeni jólétünket. Végre az is kiderül, hogy mire tartjuk az Alkotmánybíróságot, és hogy milyen intézményeket tartunk a köztársaság számára létfontosságúnak.

Talán ez a krízis kellett ahhoz, hogy ráébredjek, ráébredjünk arra, mi is a magunk felelőssége egy demokráciában. Az elmúlt 10-15  évben azt hittem, hogy ha teszem a dolgom, tisztességgel és becsülettel, akkor apránként ugyan, de majd minden egyre jobb lesz. Nem lett jobb, egyre rosszabb lett. Vártunk, várunk Brüsszelre, a Facebookos ismerősökre, a parlamenti ellenzékre, a civil szférára, az Alkotmánybíróságra, a Költségvetési Tanácsra, a harcos, autonóm médiára, az internet kollektív bölcsességére, és bíztunk benne, hogy ha probléma van, akkor ezek az erők majd mindent elrendeznek helyettünk. Ezek a pofonok kellettek, hogy ráébredjünk: a facebookos haverok csak ígérgetnek, Brüsszel túl messze van, az Alkotmánybíróságot, a médiát, a költségvetési tanácsot pedig a szemünk előtt belezték ki, tömték ki szalmával, tettek gombot a szeme helyére gondos preparátor kezek.

Az igazat megvallva én örülök a kormányzati ámokfutásnak, mert így végre tisztán látszik, mi is a mi felelősségünk, mi a mi tennivalónk, ha sorsunk jobbra fordulását reméljük. Mostanra kiderült: magunkra maradtunk. Magunk maradtunk, mi, az emberek, állampolgárok, és rajtunk kívül nincs senki más, akire számíthatnánk. Senki más, akit érdekelne a sorsunk, senki más, akinek fontosak lennénk. Magunk vagyunk, és csak magunkra számíthatunk, ha egy élhető országot szeretnénk. Úgy tűnik, hogy valamit elrontottunk, és most máshogy kell csinálnunk a dolgaink. De a mi felelősségünk, hogy a dolgok helyrejöjjenek.

A minap megértettem a berlini fal és a vasfüggöny lényegét. Megértettem, hogy miért kellettek ezek a szörnyűségek olyan sok évtizeden át. Megértettem, ahogy megértették a kommunista diktatúrák is: hogy ha nem akarják, hogy egyedül maradjanak a hagymázas, világboldogító lázálmaikkal, akkor bizony kell a fal, hogy az emberek ne tudjanak elmenni. Ha az emberek azt érzik, hogy pénzük, birtokuk után életüket, szabadságukat és a gondolataikat is magáénak akarja a hatalom, akkor gondolkodás nélkül odébb fognak állni. Elmennek, hogy ott élhessenek, ahol a hivatást megfizetik, ahol a magántulajdon szent, ahol a szólás szabad, ahol hagyják békén élni, dolgozni.

A minap olvastam, hogy soha még ennyi orvos nem akart külföldön dolgozni. A saját közgazdász egyetemi évfolyamomból is, aki tehette már külföldön dolgozik, tanít, kutat. De elmennek a kis kényszervállalkozások, szlovák rendszámmal furikáznak az autóink, és elmennek a multik is. Arra döbbentem rá, hogy a baráti beszélgetések hetek óra másról sem szólnak, mint hogy el innen. Mennek, mert a fal leomlott, és nincs semmi, ami arra tudná kényszeríteni őket, hogy itt maradjanak.

Én nem akarok elmenni. De nincs értelme úgy itt maradni, ahogy eddig voltunk itt. Nincs értelme kis kompromisszumokkal, ügyeskedve, túlélve, lavírozva, megalkudva, gyáván vagy hitevesztetten itt maradni. Őszintén szólva hálás vagyok azért, ami most velünk történik, mert végre felébredt bennem is a harci kedv, az állampolgári öntudat.

És most dühös vagyok. Őrülten dühös, hogy a hazám törvényhozásában nem hozzáértő képviselők nyújtanak be törvénytervezeteket, hanem mekk-mesterek és strómanok. Dühös vagyok, pokolian dühös, hogy aztán ezt névtelen, személyiség nélküli mamelukok akarat, vélemény és öntudat nélküli gépként meg is szavazzák. Elmondhatatlanul dühös vagyok, hogy érvek helyett blazírt hülyeségeket hallok, s közben bedől a forint, s rajtunk röhög a fél világ. Dühös vagyok borzalmasan dühös, hogy néhány senki miatt a hazámat kinevetik, leminősítik, becsmérlik és sarokba állítják Európában.  És közben nem értem, nem megy a fejembe, hogy az hogyan lehet, hogy  az otthoni pálinkafőzés egy jobbközép kétharmad számára fontosabb, mint az ügynöklisták nyilvánosságra hozása, és a kommunista múlt feltárása.

Honfitársaim!

A múltkori critical mass-en mellettem tekert egy árpád-sávos zászlót lobogtató bácsika. Valószínűleg szinte semmiben nem értenénk egyet egymással, de ott és akkor összekapcsolt minket az, hogy mindketten egy-egy bicikli nyergében ülve élveztük, hogy miénk a város. Amíg élek, emlékezni fogok erre a erre a bácsira és a találkozásunkra. Arra emlékeztet ő folyton, hogy legyen közöttünk bármekkora is a véleménykülönbség, vannak dolgok, amikben hasonlóak vagyunk. Hasonlítunk abban, hogy ez a hazánk. Hogy hiszünk a demokráciában, a magántulajdonban, abban, hogy mindenkinek joga van a véleményéhez, és nem kell féltenie a szabadságát a véleménye miatt. Hasonlítunk abban, hogy nem akarunk soha többet diktatúrában élni.

Én egy olyan országban reménykedtem eddig, ahol akkor is jó élni, ha az aktuális kormányával esetleg semmiben nem értek egyet. Lám, ide vezetett a puszta reménykedés. Nagyon sok munka vár arra, aki most nem megy el, hogy ez az álom megvalósulhasson. Mert, hogy egy lángoló tekintetű harcos fiatalembert idézzek 89 tavaszáról, Nagy Imre koporsója elől: „Senki sem hiheti, hogy a pártállam magától fog megváltozni.” Nem tudom, hogy ami most van, pártállam-e. De abban biztos vagyok, hogy a köztársaság sorsa most rajtunk áll.

Köszönöm megtisztelő figyelmüket.Barátaim!

Az igazat megvallva én örülök a mostani médiatörvénynek. Örülök neki, mert elkezdődött végre a beszélgetés arról, hogy mire is való a média, hogyan is működik az internet korában, milyen állapotban van a magyar sajtó, és hogyan lehetne a negyedik hatalmi ágat jobbá tenni. Őszintén szólva örülök a magánnyugdíjpénztárak államosításának is, mert így nem csak a magántulajdonról kell mindannyiunknak elgondolkodnunk, de arról is, hogy érdemes-e az államra bízni a jövőbeni jólétünket. Végre az is kiderül, hogy mire tartjuk az Alkotmánybíróságot, és hogy milyen intézményeket tartunk a köztársaság számára létfontosságúnak.

Talán ez a krízis kellett ahhoz, hogy ráébredjek, ráébredjünk arra, mi is a magunk felelőssége egy demokráciában. Az elmúlt 10-15 évben azt hittem, hogy ha teszem a dolgom, tisztességgel és becsülettel, akkor apránként ugyan, de majd minden egyre jobb lesz. Nem lett jobb, egyre rosszabb lett. Vártunk, várunk Brüsszelre, a Facebookos ismerősökre, a parlamenti ellenzékre, a civil szférára, az Alkotmánybíróságra, a Költségvetési Tanácsra, a harcos, autonóm médiára, az internet kollektív bölcsességére, és bíztunk benne, hogy ha probléma van, akkor ezek az erők majd mindent elrendeznek helyettünk. Ezek a pofonok kellettek, hogy ráébredjünk: a facebookos haverok csak ígérgetnek, Brüsszel túl messze van, az Alkotmánybíróságot, a médiát, a költségvetési tanácsot pedig a szemünk előtt belezték ki, tömték ki szalmával, tettek gombot a szeme helyére gondos preparátor kezek.

Az igazat megvallva én örülök a kormányzati ámokfutásnak, mert így végre tisztán látszik, mi is a mi felelősségünk, mi a mi tennivalónk, ha sorsunk jobbra fordulását reméljük. Mostanra kiderült: magunkra maradtunk. Magunk maradtunk, mi, az emberek, állampolgárok, és rajtunk kívül nincs senki más, akire számíthatnánk. Senki más, akit érdekelne a sorsunk, senki más, akinek fontosak lennénk. Magunk vagyunk, és csak magunkra számíthatunk, ha egy élhető országot szeretnénk. Úgy tűnik, hogy valamit elrontottunk, és most máshogy kell csinálnunk a dolgaink. De a mi felelősségünk, hogy a dolgok helyrejöjjenek.

A minap megértettem a berlini fal és a vasfüggöny lényegét. Megértettem, hogy miért kellettek ezek a szörnyűségek olyan sok évtizeden át. Megértettem, ahogy megértették a kommunista diktatúrák is: hogy ha nem akarják, hogy egyedül maradjanak a hagymázas, világboldogító lázálmaikkal, akkor bizony kell a fal, hogy az emberek ne tudjanak elmenni. Ha az emberek azt érzik, hogy pénzük, birtokuk után életüket, szabadságukat és a gondolataikat is magáénak akarja a hatalom, akkor gondolkodás nélkül odébb fognak állni. Elmennek, hogy ott élhessenek, ahol a hivatást megfizetik, ahol a magántulajdon szent, ahol a szólás szabad, ahol hagyják békén élni, dolgozni.

A minap olvastam, hogy soha még ennyi orvos nem akart külföldön dolgozni. A saját közgazdász egyetemi évfolyamomból is, aki tehette már külföldön dolgozik, tanít, kutat. De elmennek a kis kényszervállalkozások, szlovák rendszámmal furikáznak az autóink, és elmennek a multik is. Arra döbbentem rá, hogy a baráti beszélgetések hetek óra másról sem szólnak, mint hogy el innen. Mennek, mert a fal leomlott, és nincs semmi, ami arra tudná kényszeríteni őket, hogy itt maradjanak.

Én nem akarok elmenni. De nincs értelme úgy itt maradni, ahogy eddig voltunk itt. Nincs értelme kis kompromisszumokkal, ügyeskedve, túlélve, lavírozva, megalkudva, gyáván vagy hitevesztetten itt maradni. Őszintén szólva hálás vagyok azért, ami most velünk történik, mert végre felébredt bennem is a harci kedv, az állampolgári öntudat.

És most dühös vagyok. Őrülten dühös, hogy a hazám törvényhozásában nem hozzáértő képviselők nyújtanak be törvénytervezeteket, hanem mekk-mesterek és strómanok. Dühös vagyok, pokolian dühös, hogy aztán ezt névtelen, személyiség nélküli mamelukok akarat, vélemény és öntudat nélküli gépként meg is szavazzák. Elmondhatatlanul dühös vagyok, hogy érvek helyett blazírt hülyeségeket hallok, s közben bedől a forint, s rajtunk röhög a fél világ. Dühös vagyok borzalmasan dühös, hogy néhány senki miatt a hazámat kinevetik, leminősítik, becsmérlik és sarokba állítják Európában. És közben nem értem, nem megy a fejembe, hogy az hogyan lehet, hogy az otthoni pálinkafőzés egy jobbközép kétharmad számára fontosabb, mint az ügynöklisták nyilvánosságra hozása, és a kommunista múlt feltárása.

Honfitársaim!

A múltkori critical mass-en mellettem tekert egy árpád-sávos zászlót lobogtató bácsika. Valószínűleg szinte semmiben nem értenénk egyet egymással, de ott és akkor összekapcsolt minket az, hogy mindketten egy-egy bicikli nyergében ülve élveztük, hogy miénk a város. Amíg élek, emlékezni fogok erre a erre a bácsira és a találkozásunkra. Arra emlékeztet ő folyton, hogy legyen közöttünk bármekkora is a véleménykülönbség, vannak dolgok, amikben hasonlóak vagyunk. Hasonlítunk abban, hogy ez a hazánk. Hogy hiszünk a demokráciában, a magántulajdonban, abban, hogy mindenkinek joga van a véleményéhez, és nem kell féltenie a szabadságát a véleménye miatt. Hasonlítunk abban, hogy nem akarunk soha többet diktatúrában élni.

Én egy olyan országban reménykedtem eddig, ahol akkor is jó élni, ha az aktuális kormányával esetleg semmiben nem értek egyet. Lám, ide vezetett a puszta reménykedés. Nagyon sok munka vár arra, aki most nem megy el, hogy ez az álom megvalósulhasson. Mert, hogy egy lángoló tekintetű harcos fiatalembert idézzek 89 tavaszáról, Nagy Imre koporsója elől: „Senki sem hiheti, hogy a pártállam magától fog megváltozni.” Nem tudom, hogy ami most van, pártállam-e. De abban biztos vagyok, hogy a köztársaság sorsa most rajtunk áll.

Köszönöm megtisztelő figyelmüket.

“The hacktivism 1.0 was the activism of outsiders. Its organizing principle was to get outsiders into the territory of the other. Wikileaks, on the other hand, is an infostructure developed to be used by insiders. Its sole purpose is to help people get information out from an organization. Wikileaks shifts the source of potential threat from a few and dangerous hackers and a larger group of mostly harmless activists – both outsiders to an organization -, to those who are on the inside. For mass protesters and cyber activists anonymity is a nice, but certainly not an essential feature. For insiders trying to smuggle information out, anonymity is a necessary condition for participation. Wikileaks has demonstrated that the access to such features can be democratized, made simple and user friendly. Easy anonymity also radically transforms who the activist may be. It turns a monolithic, crystal clear identity, defined through opposition into something more complex, multilayered, hybrid, by allowing the cultivation of multiple identities, multiple loyalties.  It allows those to enter the activist scene, who do not want to define themselves – at least not publicly – as activist, radical or oppositional. The promise – or rather, the condition – of Wikileaks is that one can be in the inside and on the outside at the same time. Through anonymity the mutually exclusive categories of inside/outside, cooption/resistance, activism/passivity, power/subjection can be overridden and collapsed.”

excerpt from my upcoming publication on wikileaks, freedom and sovereignty in the cloud.“The hacktivism 1.0 was the activism of outsiders. Its organizing principle was to get outsiders into the territory of the other. Wikileaks, on the other hand, is an infostructure developed to be used by insiders. Its sole purpose is to help people get information out from an organization. Wikileaks shifts the source of potential threat from a few and dangerous hackers and a larger group of mostly harmless activists – both outsiders to an organization -, to those who are on the inside. For mass protesters and cyber activists anonymity is a nice, but certainly not an essential feature. For insiders trying to smuggle information out, anonymity is a necessary condition for participation. Wikileaks has demonstrated that the access to such features can be democratized, made simple and user friendly. Easy anonymity also radically transforms who the activist may be. It turns a monolithic, crystal clear identity, defined through opposition into something more complex, multilayered, hybrid, by allowing the cultivation of multiple identities, multiple loyalties.  It allows those to enter the activist scene, who do not want to define themselves – at least not publicly – as activist, radical or oppositional. The promise – or rather, the condition – of Wikileaks is that one can be in the inside and on the outside at the same time. Through anonymity the mutually exclusive categories of inside/outside, cooption/resistance, activism/passivity, power/subjection can be overridden and collapsed.”

excerpt from my upcoming publication on wikileaks, freedom and sovereignty in the cloud.

  1. I defended my PhD dissertation yesterday with distinction. Hurray!
  2. Stanford University Center for Internet and Society accepted me as a Non-residential Fellow. I will be in great company. I am proud and excited!

  1. Tegnap summa cum laude minősítéssel megvédtem a doktorim! Hurrá!
  2. A Stanford Center for Internet and Society befogadott Non-residential Fellow-nak. Korábban már voltam Fellow ott, de most újrapályáztattak mindenkit, és bekerültem abba a szűk körbe, akik 2010-től is részei ennek a nagyszerű csapatnak. Büszke vagyok és izgatott!

wikileakistan – Google Search

8 results (0.09 seconds)

Did you mean: wikileaks  


  1. elkhawk: I’m sure that Sarah would want us to invade Wikileaks.

    we shall prepare the armada and sail to wikileakistan to smite and smote them . rmjagg: we shall prepare the armada and sail to wikileakistan to

    www.huffingtonpost.com/…/mitch-mcconnell-wikileaks_n_792186_69701168.htmlCached


  2. Uncle Buck Embraces Tabitha Hale After Vanquishing… – Bildungblog

    1 Dec 2010 the Saucy Aussie of Wikileakistan. Posted by Fearguth at 1:28 PM. Labels: Australia, John Hawkins, Julian Assange, Movies, Tabitha Hale, bildungblog.blogspot.com/…/uncle-buck-embraces-tabitha-hale-after.htmlCached


  3. Wikileaks’ Julian Assange had a blog, the prose on it breaks my

    9 posts – 5 authors – Last post: 30 Nov that has historically led to Article 5 of NATO being invoked. No doubt soon GOP Congressmen will call for the invasion of Wikileakistan. www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=27539.0Cached

     Get more discussion results


  4. What Would Nixon Do … About WikiLeaks | The Satirical Political Report

    26 Jul 2010 WE’LL PLANT INFORMATION TO SHOW THAT SONUVABITCH JULIAN ASSANGE IS A WICCAN, AND THEN SEND B-52 BOMBERS TO PUT WIKILEAKISTAN BACK TO THE satiricalpolitical.com/2010/…/wikileaks-afghanistan-nixon-plumbers/Cached


  5. What Would Nixon Do ÔÇŽ About WikiLeaks

    WE’LL PLANT INFORMATION TO SHOW THAT SONUVABITCH JULIAN ASSANGE┬áIS A WICCAN, AND THEN SEND B-52 BOMBERS TO PUT WIKILEAKISTAN BACK TO THE DIAL-UP www.hdlns.com/…/What+Would+Nixon+Do+…+About+WikiLeaks 


  6. Professor-rat’s Blurty

    7 Sep 2010 Assuming a resurgence of interest in APster following logically on from the establishment of the virtual state of Wikileakistan, www.blurty.com/users/buttdarling/day/2010/09/07Cached


  7. Breaking: Interpol Actively Seeking Julian Assange [Updated

    30 Nov 2010 In Wikileakistan . . . rape will no longer be considered a crime, apparently. By NotGeorgeWill on Tue Nov 30, 2010 at 07:59:59 PM PST webkit.dailykos.com/stories/2010/11/30/924357/-.htmlCached


  8. Daily Kos: State of the Nation

    Maybe that’s a viewpoint of the case that’s unrepresentative of the view in

    www.dailykos.com/…/-Breaking:-Interpol-Actively-Seeking-Julian-Assange-%5BUpdated%5DCached

wikileakistan – Google Search

Did you mean: wikileaks  


Search Results


  1. elkhawk: I’m sure that Sarah would want us to invade Wikileaks.

    we shall prepare the armada and sail to wikileakistan to smite and smote them . rmjagg: we shall prepare the armada and sail to wikileakistan to
    www.huffingtonpost.com/…/mitch-mcconnell-wikileaks_n_792186_69701168.htmlCached


  2. Uncle Buck Embraces Tabitha Hale After Vanquishing… – Bildungblog

    1 Dec 2010 the Saucy Aussie of Wikileakistan. Posted by Fearguth at 1:28 PM. Labels: Australia, John Hawkins, Julian Assange, Movies, Tabitha Hale,
    bildungblog.blogspot.com/…/uncle-buck-embraces-tabitha-hale-after.htmlCached


  3. Wikileaks’ Julian Assange had a blog, the prose on it breaks my

    9 posts – 5 authors – Last post: 30 Nov

    that has historically led to Article 5 of NATO being invoked. No doubt soon GOP Congressmen will call for the invasion of Wikileakistan.
    www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=27539.0Cached

     Get more discussion results


  4. What Would Nixon Do … About WikiLeaks | The Satirical Political Report

    26 Jul 2010 WE’LL PLANT INFORMATION TO SHOW THAT SONUVABITCH JULIAN ASSANGE IS A WICCAN, AND THEN SEND B-52 BOMBERS TO PUT WIKILEAKISTAN BACK TO THE
    satiricalpolitical.com/2010/…/wikileaks-afghanistan-nixon-plumbers/Cached


  5. What Would Nixon Do ÔÇŽ About WikiLeaks

    á WE’LL PLANT INFORMATION TO SHOW THAT SONUVABITCH JULIAN ASSANGE┬áIS A WICCAN, AND THEN SEND B-52 BOMBERS TO PUT WIKILEAKISTAN BACK TO THE DIAL-UP
    www.hdlns.com/…/What+Would+Nixon+Do+…+About+WikiLeaks 


  6. Professor-rat’s Blurty

    7 Sep 2010 Assuming a resurgence of interest in APster following logically on from the establishment of the virtual state of Wikileakistan,
    www.blurty.com/users/buttdarling/day/2010/09/07Cached


  7. Breaking: Interpol Actively Seeking Julian Assange [Updated

    30 Nov 2010 In Wikileakistan . . . rape will no longer be considered a crime, apparently. By NotGeorgeWill on Tue Nov 30, 2010 at 07:59:59 PM PST
    webkit.dailykos.com/stories/2010/11/30/924357/-.htmlCached


  8. Daily Kos: State of the Nation

    Maybe that’s a viewpoint of the case that’s unrepresentative of the view in
    www.dailykos.com/…/-Breaking:-Interpol-Actively-Seeking-Julian-Assange-%5BUpdated%5DCached

If you are in Budapest on the 13th of December, I would like to invite you to the public debate of my PhD dissertation.

The topic of the dissertation is the role of copyright pirates in the cultural ecosystem. You can read a short summary here.

Time and date: December 13, 2010, 2 PM.

Location: Eötvös Lóránd University, Budapest, Múzeum krt 4. Building D, Room -114.Sok szeretettel várok mindenkit doktori disszertációm nyilvános védésére.

Az alagsori tanácsteremben igazi underground témáról lesz szó: a szerzői jogi kalózok szerepéről a kulturális termelés és csere folyamataiban.

A doktori értekezés tézisei innen letölthetők.

dr. Faludi Gábor bírálata

dr. Magyar Gábor bírálata

Válasz az opponensi vélemenyekre

Időpont: 2010. december 13., 14.00 óra.

Hely: ELTE Múzeum krt 4. D épület,  alagsori tanácsterem.

.prezi-player { width: 550px; } .prezi-player-links { text-align: center; }

cultural industries and texts

cultural industries and texts

I was an invited speaker at an international conference. The conference is on the future of cultural cities. Pécs is the European capital of culture in 2010 with huge infrastructure investments, rich programs and serious conflicts between political parties, private interests and civil society over who gets to do what. The conference asked the following questions: What are the main issues of culture-led development at the end of the decade? Where is  culture located and how can it be used in architectural, policy and management models? What is the role of culture-led development in small cities and on the peripheries?

The program is wonderful, peppered with people like Christophe Girard, Matej Bejenaru, John Belchem, Bryan Boyer, Marcus Foth, Hartmut Haussermann, Bas van Heur, Sabine Knierbein,  Bert van Meggelen, Domenico Patassini, Fabrice Raffin, Dominique Rouillard, Richard Russell, Nada Svob-Dokic, Jakub Szczesny, Szolkolai Zsolt, Takács József, Martijn de Waal.

My talk was in the Infrastructure, technology and urban culture section. I was talking about the infrastructures that are necessary to refound a city in the dataspace.

Here is the prezi of the talk.

Meghívott előadó voltam a “Kulturális Város Után” címet viselő nemzetközi konferencián. Pécs 2010-ben Európa kulturális fővárosa. Hatalmas infrastrukturális fejlesztések, gazdag program, gyilkos konfliktusok politikusok, üzleti érdekek és civilek között. A konferencia olyan kérdésekre kereste a választ, mint hogy: Mik a kulturális városfejlesztés fő kérdései az évtized végén? Mi lehet a kultúrahordozó közege és hogyan fordítható ez építészeti, policy és menedzsment modellekbe? Mi a kulturális városfejlesztés szerepe a perifériákon és a kisvárosokban?

Nagyszerű program nagyszerű emberekkel: Christophe Girard, Matej Bejenaru, John Belchem, Bryan Boyer, Marcus Foth, Hartmut Haussermann, Bas van Heur, Sabine Knierbein, Bert van Meggelen, Domenico Patassini, Fabrice Raffin, Dominique Rouillard, Richard Russell, Nada Svob-Dokic, Jakub Szczesny, Szolkolai Zsolt, Takács József, Martijn de Waal.

Én arról beszéltem, hogy milyen infrastruktúrákra van szükség a város újraalapításához a digitális térben. Itt az előadás prezije:

Michael F. Brown a couple of years ago asked the question: who owns native culture. The conflict he described centered around the place of native American artifacts in US public museums, and the right of Native Americans for self-determination over their representation as well as the material fate of artifacts that once belonged to them, as a cultural group.

I now want to raise a similar question: who owns digital native culture? If the local audiovisual heritage is accessible only thorugh YouTube, if local digital identities and social connections are stored by Facebook, if local tastes are better known by Amazon and last.fm than by anyone else, and if all of these critical infrastructures are beyond the reach of not  only individuals but for groups, nations as well, that what happens to the digital self-determination?

Everyone now is preoccupied with the privacy scandals of Facebook. That conflict is between a company and the individual. I would like to reframe that conflict by putting the group in focus, and ask: what happens to local cultures if the infrastructures they use to create, reproduce, maintain, archive their individual and group identities are not owned and/or controlled by them, in fact they have no say in the fate of the data, digital being is all about.

„Amit csak magunk javára tettünk, velünk pusztul el. Amit a többiek és a világ javára tettünk megmarad és halhatatlan.” Ez az Elveszett jelkép című  Dan Brown könyvből származó – meglehet némileg közhelyes- idézet az egyik legnépszerűbb, leggyakrabban bejelölt sor az amazon.com internetes könyváruház  által árult e-könyvek olvasói között. A könyves világ elektronizálódása nem csak azt teszi megfigyelhetővé, hogy mik az e-könyv olvasók (csak Amerikában 3 millió van belőlük) kedvenc sorai, de olyan dolgokat is, mint például, hogy mik a leggyakrabban megvásárolt, de soha el nem olvasott könyvek, mik az éjszakába nyúlóan, a leggyorsabban/lassabban/gyakrabban olvasott könyvek, hogy csak néhány példát említsek. Az e-könyvek terjesztését ellenőrző szervezet minden különösebb erőfeszítés nélkül jut korábban elképzelhetetlen mélységű és részletességű információk birtokába arról, hogy kik, mit milyen módon, hányszor, mennyi ideig, mikre ügyelve, és mely dolgokat átugorva olvasnak.

Read the rest of this entry »

english

sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkefmagyar

sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef sakéldk aélskd aéls kdélsad flkdsjf élskd félskdaf élksjda félksajd félksadj félsakdjf éslkdj félksdajf élksadj félksadj félksad jfélksadj félksdajf élksadj félksdajf élksadj félksajd flksadj félksad jfélksadj félksad jfélksadj félksajdf élksadjf élksadj félksadj félskadj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félksdaj félskda jfélsakd jfélskdajf élskdajf élkdsa jfélsakd jfélksda jfélkdsa jfélskda jfélksad jfélsakd jfélskda jfélkdsa jféldskjf élkdsjf éiwea foiewf élkwjeaféoiwae jfélkwej féoiwe jféwkef

I am reading Adrian Johns’ The Nature of the Book. For the first few hundred years the biggest problems pirates were causing was that they mutilated, transformed, abridged, etc. the texts, causing great concern for the authors. Exact copying was in this sense a rare achievement and a secondary problem. Now we seek to protect transformative uses of copyrighted materials by CC licenses and such, but condemn non-transformative copying. Ironic, but i can hardly believe, that the concerns of Martin Luther were (can be) dissipated by post-modernist intertextuality, or by technological development.

Grace and peace! What is all this, dear sirs, that one should openly rob and steal what belongs to the other, thus ruining one another? Have you now become street robbers and thieves? Or do you really imagine that God will bless and cause you to prosper through such knavery? I have gone on with the postils up till Easter, when they were secretly abstracted from the printing-press by the compositor, who maintains himself by the sweat of our brow, and who himself conveyed my writings to your most estimable town, where they were hurriedly printed and sold before the whole was finished, to the great detriment of all concerned. But I would even have put up with all this injury, had they not treated my books as they did — printing them so hurriedly and falsely — that when they reach my hands I scarcely know them to be mine. Some bits are left out, here they are displaced, there falsified, and other parts not corrected. And they have learned the art of writing Wittenberg on the top of some which have never seen Wittenberg. This is downright knavery. So let every one beware of the postils for the six Sabbaths, and let them sink into oblivion, for I do not acknowledge them as mine. Therefore take warning, my dear printers, who thus steal and rob. Other towns on the Rhine — Strassburg, etc., do not do this; and even if they did, it would not harm us so; for their publications do not reach us in the same way as yours do, being so much nearer. For you know what St. Paul says to the Thessalonians: “That no man go beyond and defraud his brother in any matter, because that the Lord is the avenger of all such.” One day you will experience this. Should not a Christian out of brotherly love wait for a month or two before he copies his work? We have put up with this till it has become unbearable, and has prevented us going on with the printing of the prophets, as we do not wish to see them spoiled, so greed and envy are delaying the spread of the Divine Word, and the fault lies at your door. Indulge your greed as much as you will, till we Germans are called brutes, but pray do not do so in the name of God. The judgment will most surely descend. May better times soon come. Amen.

Prezi created for the
Circuits of Profit: Business Network Research Conference

January 28, 2010.
Auditorium,
Central European University
http://www.ceu.hu/cns/circuits

2008 folyamán szisztematikus méréseket végeztünk néhány, Magyarországon meghatározó jelentőségű bittorrent trackeren a célból, hogy részletes, jó minőségű képet alkothassunk a peer-to-peer feketepiacok működéséről, súlyukról, jelentőségükről a kulturális piacok egészének szempontjából.

Az így nyert adatokat végül a magyarországi mozipiac elemzéséhez használtuk fel, mivel a mozis disztribúció esetében állnak rendelkezésre nyilvánosan az általunk gyűjtöttekhez mérhetően jó minőségű és részletességű adatok. A most elkészült elemzés tehát a p2p film-feketepiac és a mozifilm-forgalmazás egyes legális csatornáinak egymáshoz való viszonyát térképezi fel, mégpedig a következő három szempont szerint:

  • a feketepiaci kínálat alakulása: mitől függ, hogy melyik film és mikor válik a feketepiacon is elérhetővé?
  • a feketepiaci kereslet alakulása: mitől függ, hogy egy-egy filmnek hány letöltője lesz?
  • a p2p fájlcsere, mint autonóm fogyasztási logika leírása: mi a fájlcserélők, mint önálló tartalom-szerkesztő, tartalom-csomagoló, tartalom-terjesztő közösségek működési logikája?

Az elemzésben a feketepiac 2008 májusában és júniusában mért forgalmát, a Magyarországon 2004 után bemutatott premierfilmek forgalmazási adatait, valamint a magyarországi mozik 2000 utáni játszási adatait használtuk fel. Az elemzés nem egészen 5000 különböző film mozis és/vagy feketepiaci forgalmára terjed ki.

A  filmek feketepiaci forgalmát és a moziforgalmazás jellegzetességeit összevető, Lakatos Zoltánnal közösen írott tanulmányunk innen letölthető.

A feketepiaci kínálat
A legális forgalmazók szempontjából a legfontosabb kérdés az, hogy meg lehet-e akadályozni a mozis terjesztésbe kerülő filmek kiszivárgását a fájlcserélő hálózatokra, azaz befolyásolni lehet-e a feketepiaci kínálatot. A kutatás eredményei szerint a vizsgálat ideje alatt a feketepiacra kikerült 3600 film háromnegyede olyan alkotás volt, ami csak 2000 előtt, vagy egyáltalán nem volt mozikban, és csak alig 4%, azaz 152 film volt olyan, ami a kikerülése időpontjában a mozikban is látható volt. A vizsgált időszakban a mozikban játszott filmek közül minden ötödik került ki valamilyen formában a fájlcserélő hálózatokra. Azt a – forgalmazók szempontjából megnyugtatónak tűnő – tényt, hogy a feketepiacon elérhető filmek túlnyomó része mozis forgalmazásból már kikerült, archív tartalom, némileg árnyalja, hogy azok a filmek, amik viszont a mozis forgalmazással egy időben a feketepiacon is elérhetők, éppen a komoly PR-ral támogatott, a kiadók nagy várakozásaitól kísért, ezért sok kópiával forgalmazott (többségében nyilván hollywoodi) közönségfilmek közül kerülnek ki. A p2p kiszivárgás esélyét tovább növeli, ha a filmet sokan látják és/vagy nemzetközileg is sikeres. Minél erősebb promóciót kap egy film, annál valószínűbb, hogy kikerül a kalózhálózatokra. A p2p feketepiac kínálatának egy része erősen marketing-vezérelt.
Egészen más a helyzet a mozik műsorából hiányzó filmeknél. Ez utóbbiak kalózmegjelenését a moziforgalmazás jellemzői alig magyarázzák. Annyit mondhatunk csupán, hogy a kevesebb helyen vetített filmek a mozik programjából kikerülve kissé érdekesebbek lesznek a fájlcserélők számára, és hogy a múltban játszott filmek p2p jelenlétének esélye független a korábbi közönségsikertől, azaz korábban a filmre eladott mozijegyek számától.
Ez utóbbi jelenséggel függ össze, hogy egyes rétegműfajokba (pl, zenei, dráma, vagy romantikus filmek közé) sorolható filmek p2p elérhetősége akkor ugrik meg, amikor mozikban már nem játsszák őket. Míg a rétegműfajok esetében a fájlcserélő hálózatok archívum-funkciót töltenek be, addig más, esetleg gyorsabban avuló filmeket felsoroltató műfajok (fantasy/sci-fi, kalandfilm) esetében az aktuálisukat vesztett filmek hamar kikopnak a feketepiacról is.

A feketepiaci kereslet
A feketepiaci kereslettel foglalkozó szakaszban mindenekelőtt arra voltunk kíváncsiak, milyen tényezőkkel magyarázható az, hogy melyik filmet mennyiszer töltenek le. Azt találtunk, hogy a letöltések számára legnagyobb hatással ismét csak a kópiaszám, azaz a forgalmazói marketing-erő volt.: minél több pénzt költ a forgalmazó a mozis kereslet növelésére, annál többen nézik meg a filmet a fájlcserélők közül is. Nem találtuk azonban nyomát jelentős mértékű helyettesítésnek a mozi és a torrent között: a vizsgált két hónapban vetített filmek esetében 1 millió 650 ezer eladott jegy mellett 158 ezer letöltést regisztráltunk, azaz csak minden tízedik mozinézőre jut egy, a filmet ingyen megnéző fájlcserélő. Az alacsony helyettesítési aránynak az lehet a legfőbb oka, hogy a moziélmény alig, és csak bizonyos műfajok esetén váltható ki egy rossz minőségű p2p kópia kis-képernyős megtekintésével.

A fenti ökölszabály ez egyes műfajok esetében némileg módosulhat. Az akció/thriller és a bűnügyi filmek az átlagnál kisebb mozis közönséget vonzottak, fájlcsere-forgalmuk mégis jóval átlag feletti volt. E műfajok közönségében valószínűleg felülreprezentáltak a férfiak, sőt a fiatal férfiak ― vagyis az a demográfiai csoport, amelyik a fájlcserélő-populációban is teljes lakosságon belüli arányát jelentősen meghaladó súlyt képvisel. E műfajok közönségének fájlcseréléssel foglalkozó szegmense szinte reflexszerűen lecsap a trackereken megjelenő legújabb „erőszakfilmekre”. Az erőszakfilmek kiugró kalózkeresletével szemben a romantikus filmek az átlagnál nagyobb mozis közönséget, viszont az átlagnál kevesebb fájlcserélőt vonzottak, amire viszont épp a „kettesben mozizás” jelenségére adhat magyarázatot.

Ami a moziban már nem látható filmeket illeti: a letöltött teljes filmvolumen több mint fele magyarországi mozikban 2000 óta nem játszott produkció. A felhasználók kevesebb, mint 10%-a töltött le kizárólag a letöltés idejében mozikban játszott filmeket, kétharmaduk éppen moziműsoron lévő és mozikban már nem játszott filmeket egyaránt letölt. Meglepően magas, közel 30% azoknak az aránya, akik csak moziban nem vagy régen vetített filmeket töltöttek le.

A fájlcserélők, mint autonóm fogyasztási közösségek
A folyamatos jogi fenyegetettség a korábban nyíltan fájlcserélő felhasználókat rejtőzködésre kényszeríti. A zárt ajtók mögé visszavonuló felhasználók kegyeiért számtalan tematikusan, nyelvileg, a felhasználói kör érdeklődésében, a közösség minőségében különböző fájlcserélő oldal verseng egymással. E közösségek mindegyike a maga logikája szerint válogat a világban elérhető számtalan tartalom közül.
Kutatásunkban három, magyar nyelvű, mainstream, tematikusan nem specializálódott közösség tartalomfogyasztási mintáit vizsgáltuk és azt találtuk, hogy e közösségek tartalomfogyasztása műfaji értelemben strukturálatlan, azaz a fájlcserélők kihasználják az ismeretlen kipróbálásának kockázat- és költségmentes lehetőségét, és tetszés szerint kalandoznak különböző műfajok között.

A nem specializálódott, mainstream p2p kereslet műfaji strukturálatlansága arra utal, hogy a fájlcserélésnek köszönhetően a tetszőleges ízlésű filmfogyasztó számára az „elkalandozás” saját preferenciájától, új műfajok, stílusok kockázat nélküli kipróbálása nem csupán elvi, hanem a gyakorlatban is kiaknázott lehetőség. A p2p kalózpiac egyik oldalán a tematikus struktúrák sokkal pontosabban jelennek meg, mint korábban ― köszönhetően annak, hogy a speciális tartalomtípusok köré szerveződő közönség kiszolgálása elől eltűnnek azok a méretgazdaságossági korlátok, melyekbe a piaci viszonyok között működő csatornák szükségszerűképpen beleütköznek. Másrészt az általános érdeklődési kört kiszolgáló hálózatok által a fogyasztóiknak felkínált tartalmi kalandozás, exploratív nomadizmus radikálisan különbözik az ezt a lehetőséget legális piacokon a televízió által biztosító channel-surfing, „zapping” élményétől. A p2p felhasználó a „véletlenül odakapcsolok-belenézek-nem tetszik-elkapcsolok” tévés logika helyett a „nem tudom mi ez-de letöltöm-kipróbálom-legfeljebb letörlöm-de az is lehet, hogy archiválom” aktív érdeklődést feltételező logikájával választ a tartalmak között.

További fontos tényező, hogy ezeken a csatornákon a programot maguk a felhasználók állítják össze: ők kérik, készítik el, szerkesztik be a műsorfolyamba, teszik elérhetővé be a friss kópiákat. A torrent-alapú filmdisztribúció egy viszonylag rövid életciklusú, az aktuális legális kínálatot koncentráltan, a felhasználók ad-hoc érdeklődését pedig fragmentáltan megjelenítő jukeboxhoz hasonlítható, ahol a kereslet az éppen aktuálisan felkerült néhány tucat, esetleg párszáz film között oszlik el. A filmes fájlcsere valahol félúton van a legális piacról mára szinte teljesen kikopott videokölcsönző és a tematikus tévécsatorna között, ahol a kínálatot és a programot a hálózatok közösségét alkotó felhasználók folyamatosan és interaktív módon alakítják. A globális feketepiacon elérhető tartalomkínálat körül helyileg releváns kontextusok alakulnak ki, amelyek a végső soron mindenki számára egyformán elérhető digitális kínálatot a helyi közösség igényei, értékei, érdeklődése alapján szűrik.
A fájlcsere mint sajátos szabályokkal, modus operandival bíró tartalomdisztribúciós infrastruktúra és a köré szerveződő fogyasztói közösségek térnyerése arra figyelmeztet, hogy a filmes disztribúciót nemcsak az alkotások elsődleges piaci jellemzői (ár, kínálat) felől, hanem a tartalmak fogyasztásának kontextusa, a tartalmak összefűzéséből létrejövő programming oldaláról is kihívás éri. A feketepiacok működése részben megelőlegezi, részben visszaigazolja a kulturális piacok átalakulásának azt a hipotézisét, mely szerint a disztribúciós szűkösség korában a termelők és a disztribútorok által generált és dominált kontextusok helyét fogyasztók által generált és tartalombőséggel jellemezhető kontextus veszi át. Ebben a tekintetben az online feketepiac (Magyarországon legalábbis) egyértelműen hiánypótló szerepet tölt be.

“my roommate often complained about the unreliability” – Google Search

“My roommate often complained about the unreliability” – might sound like a quite common phrase to utter. Well, it appears only twice: in Shawn Fannings court declaration in defence of Napster, and in an article citing this declaration. It is either that people don’t have roomates anymore, or these roomates don’t complain, or things are finally reliable. 🙂

The Register

Thousands – or to be more precise, six thousands – of lucky alleged infringers a week are to be informed of the error of their ways, according to the terms of the deal struck this week between the British government and six major ISPs. They will in the first instance be “informed when their accounts are being used unlawfully to share copyright material and pointed towards legal alternatives.”

And in the second instance? That is yet to be determined, and the ISPs and rights holders signing the Memorandum of Understanding with the government have been sent off for four months to figure out the ‘or what?’ bit of the deal.

In the meantime those letters will be cranking out. The targets will be identified by “music rights holders” who will pass the data on to the ISPs, who will then run the system as a trial for three months. So that’s about 70,000 letters in total, the number of suspects being dependent on whether they’re going to bombard the same people with information regarding the unlawful nature of some of their account’s activities, or whether they go for a ‘one per deviant’ rule.

The evidence of this trial period will be analysed, and depending on what that tells them they’ll agree with Offcom an escalation in numbers, a widening of content coverage (presumably to video), and “a process for agreeing a cap.” That is, not a cap in itself, but a process for agreeing one. This (we speculate) might take into account factors such as cost of stamps to ISPs, level of music business profitability, percentage of deviants in total user base, ratio of ridicule experienced by music industry to ridicule experienced by ISPs, and the price of sardines. Or something.

The two aspects of the letter – drawing the user’s attention to the infringement and pointing them at legal alternatives – are likely to be important in determining the success of the trial. Some users – possibly, as Feargal Sharkey thinks, most – are likely to be scared off when they learn that somebody’s watching them, but adequate legal alternatives (which the ISPs say they’re going to set up) will have to exist in order for the customers to be directed to them, and to carry on using them.

It seems doubtful that this will be the case in four months time, when the working group is due to report back back with proposals to deal with the hard cases. Despite fevered reporting in some newspapers, ‘three strikes’ doesn’t figure in this and the measures being considered are light on savagery. “The group will… look at solutions including technical measures such as traffic management or filtering, and marking of content to facilitate its identification. In addition, rights holders will consider prosecuting particularly serious infringers in appropriate cases.”

The ISPs already do traffic management, so that could just mean more of the same. Content marking would have to be done by the rights holders and would simplify filtering, if they decided they were going to do filtering, while rights holders busting serious infringers is pretty much what rights holders do already.

Fevered press coverage of a ‘crackdown on filesharers’ seems to derive in the main from the government’s “alternative regulatory options”. These are effectively various things the Nasty Party might do if the preferred option of voluntary measures and a little light rule-making enforced by Offcom doesn’t pan out. One of these light rules will ensure “that all ISPs are required to undertake an appropriate level of action to achieve the desired result.” So the ISPs signing the MOU won’t be disadvantaged by users fleeing to refusenik ISPs, because there will be no refusenik ISPs -“ISPs who choose not to engage in the self-regulatory arrangement would remain bound by the underlying requirement to have an effective policy on unlawful P2P file- sharing.”

Currently four tougher alternatives to this regime are being floated, and they still don’t include ‘three strikes’. Option A1 proposes legislation making it possible for rights holders to get personal data of infringement suspects on request, rather than having to apply for a court order. This would make it cheaper to sue infringers than it currently is, and could possibly mean an increase in prosecutions, but this only seems possible if the rights holders decided all deals were off, threw their toys out of the pram and went nuclear. Or they might just want to add everybody to their mailing lists, but we doubt that.

Option A2 seems similarly BPI-friendly. “Typically, under the terms of the contract between an ISP and an Internet service subscriber, the subscriber is not allowed to use the account for illegal purposes. Obliging ISPs to take action to enforce this contractual term in some way, for example to warn, suspend or terminate the Internet accounts of file-sharers, or to use other technical options would avoid lengthy, costly legal action.”

Getting the ISPs to “implement their own terms and conditions” is one of the BPI’s refrains, and if they were to do this in accordance with the BPI’s wishes, then they’d be warning people, suspending them, kicking them off… Which could indeed end up looking and feeling like three strikes, but these are alternative options, remember – they are not currently on the table.

Option A3 is basically Option A2, but sitting in between the rights holders and the ISPs would be a third party regulatory body which would assess the evidence, direct the ISP to take appropriate action and hear appeals and complaints. This would be costly and complex – and the government seems not to like it much.

Finally, Option A4 (there are no B options, or if there are they’re secret) covers filtering equipment. The government seems quite taken with this, claiming:

“There are technologies available which can filter Internet traffic. These can identify particular types of file (eg music files), check whether the file is subject to copyright protection and then check whether the person offering the file for download has the right to do so. If no such permission is found, the filter can block the download. These technologies vary in their effectiveness and cannot guarantee 100% accuracy given the lack of conformity between different computer and software technologies.”

And: “If the download is in breach of copyright the filter can block the download before it has been completed. No breach therefore occurs.”

Which is cool, if true. The rights holder doesn’t lose revenue because there’s no infringement, the ISP doesn’t need to do any threatening or booting, and it “may not require costly regulatory processes to be established or require issues of data protection to be addressed.” It could indeed be the government’s preferred magic bullet if all of that turned out to be true.

Unfortunately: “Opinion seems to be divided between stakeholders on whether filters could be an effective, long-term, cost-effective way of tackling not only P2P piracy but also other forms of copyright infringement. It might be valuable, in addition to moving forward on P2P, if rights holders and ISPs jointly investigated the technical, legal and cost issues around filters and assessed their utility in addressing unlawful online activity.”

Which is how the filtering bit got into the brief for the MOU group that’s reporting back in four months. Tune in then to see whether the ISPs and the BPI can save their marriage. ®

Kevin Kelly   writes about needing only 1000 true fans to make a living as an artist. Just to note: I was writing about this in 2006.

(June 3, 2005). Bridgeport Music, Inc., et al. v. Dimension Films, et al.: UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SIXTH CIRCUIT. more… (2007). Digital Music Report 2006: IFPI. more…

(2006). The Economy of Culture in Europe: KEA European Affairs; Media Group (Turku School of Economics); MKW Wirtschaftsforschung GmbH. more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…

(Mai 2005). Etude D’impact D’une Remuneration Alternative Sur Les Echanges Peer To Peer: UFC – Que Choisir. more…

(March 8, 2006). An Examination of Consumer Satisfaction With Commercial Radio in Canada (Vol. 1): Strategic Inc. more…

(2006/01/20). File-sharing ‘not cut by courts’, BBC. more…

(2006). Monitoring and Identifying P2P Media by BigChampagne Online Media Measurement: SPEDIDAM. more…

(1735). A second letter from an author to a Member of Parliament; containing, some further remarks on a late letter concerning the bill now depending in the House of Commons, for the encouragement of learning, &c. London. more…

(2005. június). A szerzői jogi alapú ágazatok gazdasági súlya Magyarországon (pp. 121). Budapest: Magyar Szabadalmi Hivatal. more…

(April 3, 2001). Testimony of the Future of Music Coalition on “Online Entertainment and Copyright Law: Coming Soon to a Digital Device Near You.” Senate Judiciary Committee (pp. 13). Washington, DC: Future of Music Coalition. more…

(December 12, 1906). Twain’s Plant to Beat The Copyright Law, New York Times. New York, NY. more…

(2003). ‘Two relationships to a cultural public domain. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 239(224). more…

Adelstein, R. P., & Peretz, S. I. (1985). ‘The competition of technologies in markets for ideas: Copyright and fair use in evolutionary perspective’, International Review of Law and Economics, 5(2), 209-238. Stable URL more…

Akerlof, G. A., Hahn, R., Litan, R. E., Arrow, K. J., Bresnahan, T. F., Buchanan, J. M., et al. (2002). The Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998: An Economic Analysis: AEI-Brookings Joint Center. more…

Alford, W. P. (1993). ‘Don’t Stop Thinking about…Yesterday: Why There Was No Indigenous Counterpart to Intellectual Property Law in Imperial China’, Journal of Chinese Law, 7. more…

ALLIANCE, I. I. P. (2006). 2006 Special 301: Hungary. more…, more…

Anand, B., & Galetovic, A. (2004). ‘Strategies That Work When Property Rights Don’t’, pp. 261-304 in G. Libecap (ed), Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship. Greenwich, Conn.: JAI Press. more…

Andersson, J. (2006). ‘The Pirate Bay and the ethos of sharing’ in A. e. a. Hadzi (ed), Deptford.TV Diaries. London: Openmute Publishing. more…

Argentesi, E., Alvisi, M., & Carbonara, E. (2002). Piracy and Quality Choice in Monopolistic Markets: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Armstrong, E. (1990). Before copyright : the French book-privilege system 1498-1526. Cambridge [England] ; New York: Cambridge University Press. more…

Astbury, R. (1978). ‘The Renewal of the Licensing Act in 1693 and its Lapse in 1695’, Library, s5-XXXIII(4), 296-322. Stable URL more…

Atkins, R., Mintcheva, S., & National Coalition against Censorship (U.S.). (2006). Censoring culture : contemporary threats to free expression. New York: New Press : Distributed by W.W Norton.

Bakos, Y., & Brynjolfsson, E. (1999). ‘Bundling information goods: Pricing, profits, and efficiency’, Management Science, 45(12), 1613-1630. more…

Banerjee, A., Faloutsos, M., & Bhuyan, L. N. (2007). P2P:Is Big Brother Watching You? Riverside: Department of Computer Science and Engineering

University of California. more…

Barber, G. (1961). ‘Galignani’s and the Publication of English Books in France from 1800 to 1852’, Library, s5-XVI(4), 267-286. Stable URL more…

Basho, K. (2000). ‘The licensing of our personal information: Is it a solution to Internet privacy?’ California Law Review, 88(5), 1507-1545.

Becker, J. U., & Clement, M. (2003). ‘Generation Napster – Analysis of the economic rationale to share files in peer-to-peer-networks’, Wirtschaftsinformatik, 45(3), 261-271.

Becker, J. U., & Clement, M. (2006). ‘Dynamics of illegal participation in peer-to-peer networks – Why do people illegally share media files?’ Journal of Media Economics, 19(1), 7-32. more…

Benkler, Y. (2000). ‘An unhurried view of private ordering in information transactions’, Vanderbilt Law Review, 53(6), 2063-2080.

Benkler, Y. (2002). ‘Coase’s penguin, or, Linux and The Nature of the Firm’, Yale Law Journal, 112(3), 369-+.

Benkler, Y. (2003). ‘Through the looking glass: Alice and the constitutional foundations of the public domain.(Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 173(152). more…

Benkler, Y. (Nov 2000). ‘An unhurried view of private ordering in information transactions’, Vanderbilt Law Review 53(6), 2063. more…

Benkler, Y. (2006). The wealth of networks : how social production transforms markets and freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press. Stable URL more…

Bennett, S. (1976). ‘John Murray’s Family Library and the Cheapening of Books in Early Nineteenth Century Britain’, Studies in Bibliography, 29, 139-166. Stable URL

Bernstein, D. (January 26, 2004). Music Royalties Rise, Even as CD Sales Fall, The New York Times. New York more…

Besen, S. M., & Kirby, S. N. (1989). ‘Private Copying, Appropriability, and Optimal Copying Royalties’, Journal of Law & Economics, 32(2), 255-280. more…

Bettig, R. V. (1996). Copyrighting culture : the political economy of intellectual property. Boulder, Colo: Westview Press.

Bhattacharjee, S., Gopal, R. D., Lertwachara, K., & Marsden, J. R. (2003). Economic of online music, Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Electronic commerce. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: ACM. more…

Bhattacharjee, S., Gopal, R. D., Lertwachara, K., & Marsden, J. R. (2006). ‘Impact of Legal Threats on Online Music Sharing Activity: An Analysis of Music Industry Legal Actions’, Journal of Law & Economics, 49(1), 91-114. Stable URL more…

Birn, R. (1970). ‘The Profits of Ideas: Privileges en Librairie in Eighteenth-Century France’, Eighteenth-Century Studies, 4(2), 131-168. Stable URL more…

Blackburn, D. (2004). On-line Piracy and Recorded Music Sales. Cambridge, Mass. more…

Blagden, C. (1955). ‘The English Stock of the Stationers’ Company An account of its origins’, Library, s5-X(3), 163-185. Stable URL more…

Blomqvist, U., Eriksson, L.-E., Findahl, O., Selg, H., & Wallis, R. Trends in downloading and filesharing of music, MusicLessons – Broadband technologies transforming business models and challenging regulatory frameworks – lessons from the music industry. more…

Bô, D., Claire-Marie Lévêque, Marsiglia, A., Lellouche, R., Danard, B., & Jeanneau, C. (2004 Mai). La piraterie de films: Motivations et pratiques des Internautes: Centre National de la Cinématographie. more…

Bokor, J., & Kováts, I. (1975). Hanglemezgyártás és kereskedelem. Budapest: Tömegkommunikációs Kutatóközpont. more…

Boldrin, M., & Levine, D. K. (2004). ‘2003 Lawrence R. Klein lecture the case against intellectual monopoly’, International Economic Review, 45(2), 327-350. more…

Bond, R. P. (December 1963). ‘The Pirate and the Tatler’, The Library, XVIII(4), 257. more…

Borghi, M. (2003). Writing Practices in Privilege and Intellectual Property Systems. more…

Bouckaert, B., & Geest, G. d. (2000). ‘1610 Copyright’ in Encyclopedia of law and economics. Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar. more…

Bowbrick, P. (1983). ‘The Economics of Superstars – Comment’, American Economic Review, 73(3), 459-459.

Bowrey, K. (1996). ‘Who’s writing copyright’s history?’ European Intellectual Property Review, 18(6), 322-329. more…

Boyle, J. The Second Enclosure Movement and the Construction of the Public Domain: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Boyle, J. (1992). ‘A Theory of Law and Information: Copyright, Spleens, Blackmail, and Insider Trading’, California Law Review, 80(6), 1413-1540. Stable URL more…

Boyle, J. (2000). ‘Cruel, mean, or lavish? Economic analysis, price discrimination and digital intellectual property’, Vanderbilt Law Review, 53(6), 2007-2039. more…

Boyle, J. (2002). ‘Fencing off ideas: enclosure & the disappearance of the public domain’, Daedalus, 131(2), 13(13).

Boyle, J. (2003). ‘The second enclosure movement and the construction of the public domain.(Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 33(42). more…

Bracha, O. (2005). Owning Ideas: A History of Anglo-American Intellectual Property (Vol. S.J.D.): Harvard Law School. more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…

Breyer, S. (1970). ‘The Uneasy Case for Copyright: A Study of Copyright in Books, Photocopies, and Computer Programs’, Harvard Law Review, 84(2), 281-351. Stable URL more…

Brooker, R. (September 2005). Investigation into The Cultural Diversity of Music Download Web Sites, Intertek Research & Performance Testing Technical Report (Vol. 1). London: Intertek. more…

Brynjolfsson, E., Hu, Y. J., & Smith, M. D. (2003). Consumer Surplus in the Digital Economy: Estimating the Value of Increased Product Variety at Online Booksellers: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Buchanan, J. M., & Yoon, Y. J. (2000). ‘Symmetric tragedies, commons and anticommons’, Journal of Law and Economics, 43(1), 1-13. more…

Buchanan, J. M., & Yoon, Y. J. (2001). ‘MAJORITARIAN MANAGEMENT OF THE COMMONS’, Economic Inquiry, 39(3), 396. more…

Chard, L. F. (1977). ‘Bookseller to Publisher: Joseph Johnson and the English Book Trade, 1760 to 1810’, Library, s5-XXXII(2), 138-154. Stable URL more…

Chartier, R. (2002). ‘Property & privilege in the republic of letters: translated by Arthur Goldhammer’, Daedalus, 131(2), 60(67). more…

Chellappa, R. K., & Shivendu, S. (2003). ‘Economic implications of variable technology standards for movie piracy in a global context’, Journal of Management Information Systems, 20(2), 137-168.

Chellappa, R. K., & Shivendu, S. (2005). ‘Managing piracy: Pricing and sampling strategies for digital experience goods in vertically segmented markets’, Information Systems Research, 16(4), 400-417.

Chen, Y.-n., & Png, I. (2003). ‘Information Goods Pricing and Copyright Enforcement: Welfare Analysis’, Info. Sys. Research, 14(1), 107-123. more…

Chesterman, J., & Lipman, A. (1988). The electronic pirates : DIY crime of the century. London: Routledge.

Clarke, J., Hall, S., Jefferson, S., & Roberts, B. (1997). ‘Subcultures, Cultures and Class’, pp. xvi, 599 p. in K. Gelder & S. Thornton (eds), The subcultures reader. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL more…

Claus, P. Danish file-sharing, Piratgruppen: Lessig Blog Archive. Stable URL more…

Coase, R. H. (1979). ‘Payola in Radio and Television Broadcasting’, Journal of Law and Economics, 22(2), 269-328. Stable URL more…

Cohen, A. K. (1997). ‘A General Theory of Subcultures’, pp. xvi, 599 p. in K. Gelder & S. Thornton (eds), The subcultures reader. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL more…

Cohen, D. J., & Rosenzweig, R. (2006). Digital history : a guide to gathering, preserving, and presenting the past on the Web. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Stable URL

Cohen, J. E. (1905). Copyright and the Perfect Curve: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Condorcet, M. D. (2002). ‘Fragments concerning freedom of the press: excerpts selected and translated by Arthur Goldhammer’, Daedalus, 131(2), 57(53). more…

Condry, I. (2004). ‘Cultures of music piracy: an ethnographic comparison of the US and Japan’, International Journal of Cultural Studies, 7(3), 343-363. more…

Connolly, M., & Krueger, A. B. (2006). ‘Rockonomics: The Economics of Popular Music’, pp. 667-719 in: Elsevier. Stable URL more…

Coombe, R. J. (1991). ‘Objects of Property and Subjects of Politics – Intellectual Property Laws and Democratic Dialog’, Texas Law Review, 69(7), 1853-1880. more…

Coombe, R. J. (1998). The cultural life of intellectual properties : authorship, appropriation, and the law. Durham: Duke University Press. more…

Cooper, M. N. (March 2005). Time For The Recording Industry To Face The Music: The Political, Social And Economic Benefits Of Peer-To-Peer Communications Networks (Vol. 1, pp. 79): Consumer Federation Of America. more…

Cowen, T. (October 2004). How the United States Funds the Arts. In M. Bauerlein (Ed.): National Endowment for the Arts. more…

Cox, J. E. (1997). ‘Publishers, publishing and the Internet: How journal publishing will survive and prosper in the electronic age’, Electronic Library, 15(2), 125-131.

Danard, B., & Jeanneau, C. (Mai 2004). Le téléchargement de films sur Internet: Centre national de la cinématographie. more…

Darnton, R. (1982). The literary underground of the Old Regime. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. Stable URL *** DOCUMENT BOUNDARY *** more…

Darnton, R. (2003). ‘The Science of Piracy: A Crucial Ingredient in Eighteenth-Century Publishing’, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 12, 3-29. more…

Davies, G., & Hung, M. E. (1993). Music and video private copying : an international survey of the problem and the law. London: Sweet & Maxwell.

Davies, W. (01 December 2005). Markets in the Online Public Sphere: Institute for Public Policy Research. more…

Delacroix, F., Danard, B., & Jardillier, S. (2005). L’offre « pirate » de films sur Internet: Centre national de la cinématographie. more…

Demsetz, H. (1969). ‘Information and Efficiency: Another Viewpoint’, Journal of Law and Economics, 12(1), 1-22. Stable URL more…

Diderot, D. (2002). ‘Letter on the book trade: excerpts selected and translated by Arthur Goldhammer’, Daedalus, 131(2), 48(49).

Domon, K., & Nakamura, K. Unauthorized Copying and Copyright Enforcement in Developing Countries: A Vietnam Case Study: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Donaldson, A. (1764). Some Thoughts on the State of Literary Property. more…

Dreyfuss, R. C. (Nov 2000). ‘Games Economists Play.’ Vanderbilt Law Review, 53(6), 9. more…

Dubosson-Torbay, M., Pigneur, Y., & Usunier, J.-C. (2004). Business Models for Music Distribution after the P2P Revolution, Fourth International Conference on Web Delivering of Music: IEEE. more…

Duchene, A., & Waelbroeck, P. (2006). ‘The legal and technological battle in the music industry: Information-push versus information-pull technologies’, International Review of Law and Economics, 26(4), 565-580.

Duffy, J. F. (2004). ‘The marginal cost controversy in intellectual property’, University of Chicago Law Review, 71(1), 37-56. more…

Eisenstein, E. L. (1983). The printing revolution in early modern Europe. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York: Cambridge University Press. more…

Eisenstein, E. L. (2005). The printing revolution in early modern Europe. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press. Stable URL

Ewing, J. (September 2003). ‘Copyright and authors’, First Monday, 8(10), URL (consulted Retrieved Date) Stable URL more…

Feather, J. (1994). Publishing, piracy, and politics : an historical study of copyright in Britain. New York, N.Y.: Mansell. more…

Febvre, L. P. V., & Martin, H.-J. (1976). The coming of the book : the impact of printing 1450-1800. London: N.L.B. more…

Feldman, Y., & Nadler, J. (2005). Expressive Law and File Sharing Norms: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Fernandes, S. (September 2005). Online Music Download Services, Intertek Research & Performance Testing Technical Report (Vol. 2). London: Intertek. more…

Fichte, J. G. (1793). Proof of the Illegality of Reprinting: A Rationale and a Parable. more…

Fisher III, W. W. (October 10, 2000). ‘Digital Music: Problems and Possibilities’, URL (consulted Retrieved Date) http://www.law.harvard.edu/Academic_Affairs/coursepages/tfisher/Music.html. Stable URL more…

Fisher III, W. W. (1999). ‘Property and Contract on the Internet’, Chicago-Kent Law Review, 73. more…

Frank, B. (1996). ‘On an art without copyright’, Kyklos, 49(1), 3-15.

Gaines, J. M. (2006). ‘Early cinema’s heyday of copying – The too many copies of L’Arroseur arrose (The Waterer Watered)’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 227-244. more…

Galbi, D. (2003). Copyright and Creativity: Authors and Photographers: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Gallini, N., & Scotchmer, S. (2003). Intellectual Property: When is it the Best Incentive System? : UCLA Department of Economics. Stable URL more…

Gayer, A., & Shy, O. (2003). ‘Internet and peer-to-peer distributions in markets for digital products’, Economics Letters, 81(2), 197-203.

Gayer, A., & Shy, O. (2006). ‘Publishers, artists, and copyright enforcement’, Information Economics and Policy, 18(4), 374-384. more…

Geist, M. A. (2005). In the public interest : the future of Canadian copyright law. Toronto: Irwin Law. Stable URL more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…, more…

Gelder, K., & Thornton, S. (1997). The subcultures reader. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL

Geller, P. E. Copyright History and the Future: What’s Culture Got to Do With It?: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Gensollen, M. (2007). ‘Information Goods and Online Communities’ in E. Brousseau & N. Curien (eds), Internet and Digital Economics: Cambridge University Press. more…

Ghosh, R. A. (2005). CODE : collaborative ownership and the digital economy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Givon, M., Mahajan, V., & Muller, E. (1995). ‘Software Piracy – Estimation of Lost Sales and the Impact on Software Diffusion’, Journal of Marketing, 59(1), 29-37. more…

Goldhammer, A. (2002). ‘On Diderot & Condorcet.(Denis Diderot, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas de Caritat)(Brief Article)’, Daedalus, 131(2), 46(42). more…

Goldstein, P. (2000). ‘Comment on “lessons from studying the international economics of intellectual property rights”‘, Vanderbilt Law Review, 53(6), 2241-2244. more…

Goldstein, P. (2003). Copyright’s highway : from Gutenberg to the celestial jukebox. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford Law and Politics. Stable URL more…

Goldstein, P. (2005). ‘Copyright’s Commons’, Columbia Journal of Law & The Arts, 29(1). more…

Gopal, R. D., Bhattacharjee, S., & Sanders, G. L. (2006). ‘Do artists benefit from online music sharing?’ Journal of Business, 79(3), 1503-1533. more…

Gopal, R. D., & Sanders, G. L. (1998). ‘International software piracy: Analysis of key issues and impacts’, Information Systems Research, 9(4), 380-397.

Gopal, R. D., Sanders, G. L., Bhattacharjee, S., Agrawal, M., & Wagner, S. C. (2004). ‘A behavioral model of digital music piracy’, Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce, 14(2), 89-105.

Gordon, M. (1997). ‘The Concept of Sub-Culture and Its Application’, pp. xvi, 599 p. in K. Gelder & S. Thornton (eds), The subcultures reader. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL more…

Gordon, W. J. (1982). ‘Fair Use as Market Failure: A Structural and Economic Analysis of the “Betamax” Case and Its Predecessors’, Columbia Law Review, 82(8), 1600-1657. Stable URL more…

Gurnsey, J. (1995). Copyright theft. Aldershot, Hampshire, England

Brookfield, VT: Aslib Gower ;

Gower.

Hamermesh, D. S., Johnson, G. E., & Weisbrod, B. A. (1982). ‘Scholarship, Citations and Salaries – Economic Rewards in Economics’, Southern Economic Journal, 49(2), 472-481. more…

Harrison, F. M. (1934). ‘NATHANIEL PONDER: THE PUBLISHER OF THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS’, Library, s4-XV(3), 257-294. Stable URL more…

Hars, A., & Ou, S. S. (2002). ‘Working for free? Motivations for participating in open-source projects’, International Journal of Electronic Commerce, 6(3), 25-39.

Heald, P. J. (2007). Property Rights and the Efficient Exploitation of Copyrighted Works: An Empirical Analysis of Public Domain and Copyrighted Fiction Best Sellers: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Hebdige, D. (1997). ‘Subculture: The Meaning of Style’, pp. xvi, 599 p. in K. Gelder & S. Thornton (eds), The subcultures reader. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL more…

Hemmungs Wirtâen, E. (2004). No trespassing : authorship, intellectual property rights, and the boundaries of globalization. Toronto ;: University of Toronto Press.

Hemmungs Wirtén, E. (2004). No trespassing : authorship, intellectual property rights, and the boundaries of globalization. Toronto ; Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. more…

Herman, A., Coombe, R. J., & Kaye, L. (2006). ‘Your second life? Goodwill and the performativity of intellectual property in online digital gaming’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 184-210. more…

Hesmondhalgh, D. (2007). The cultural industries. London, UK ; Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Hess, C., & Ostrom, E. (2003). ‘Ideas, artifacts, and facilities: information as a common-pool resource.(Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 111(135). more…

Hesse, C. (1990). ‘Enlightenment Epistemology and the Laws of Authorship in Revolutionary France, 1777-1793’, Representations(30), 109-137. Stable URL more…

Hesse, C. (2002). ‘The rise of intellectual property, 700 B.C.–A.D. 2000: an idea in the balance’, Daedalus, 131(2), 26(20). more…

Hesse, C. A. (1991). Publishing and cultural politics in revolutionary Paris, 1789-1810. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Hietanen, H., Oksanen, V., & Välimäki, M. (2007). Community Created Content – Law, Business, Policy: Turre Publishing. more…

Holdsworth, W. S. (1920). ‘Press Control and Copyright in the 16th and 17th Centuries’, The Yale Law Journal, 29(8), 841-858. Stable URL more…

Huang, C. Y. (2005). ‘File sharing as a form of music consumption’, International Journal of Electronic Commerce, 9(4), 37-55.

Huang, T. W. S. (1971). ‘Protection of American Copyrights under Nationalist Chinese Law’, Harvard International Law Journal, 12. more…

Hughes, J. Copyright and Incomplete Historiographies: Of Piracy, Propertization, and Thomas Jefferson: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Hughes, J. (2006). Locke’s 1694 Memorandum (and More Incomplete Copyright Historiographies): SSRN. Stable URL more…

Hui, K. L., & Png, I. P. L. (2002). ‘On the supply of creative work: Evidence from the movies’, American Economic Review, 92(2), 217-220. more…

Hunter, D., & Lastowka, G. Amateur-to-Amateur: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Hunyadi, Z. (2004. november). A budapestiek kulturálódási szokásai. Budapest: Magyar Művelődési Intézet; MTA Szociológiai Kutatóintézet. Stable URL more…

Hunyadi, Z. (2005. szeptember). Kulturálódási és szabadidő eltöltési szokások, életmód csoportok. Budapest: Magyar Művelődési Intézet. Stable URL more…

Hunyadi, Z., & Dudás, K. (2005. június). A hagyományos (színház, hangverseny, kiállítás) és a modern tömegkultúra (mozi, könnyűzenei koncert) helye és szerepe a kulturális fogyasztásban. Budapest: Magyar Művelődési Intézet. Stable URL more…

IFPI. (2001). IFPI Music Piracy Report. more…

IFPI. (2006). The Recording Industry 2006 Piracy Report: IFPI. more…

Irwin, J. (1997). ‘Notes on the Status of the Concept Subculture’, pp. xvi, 599 p. in K. Gelder & S. Thornton (eds), The subcultures reader. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL more…

Jaccard, M. A. (1997). ‘Securing copyright in transnational cyberspace: The case for contracting with potential infringers’, Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, 35(3), 619-662.

Jaszi, P. (1991). ‘Toward a Theory of Copyright – the Metamorphoses of Authorship’, Duke Law Journal(2), 455-502. more…

Jaszi, P. (1994). ‘On the Author Effect: Recovering Collectivity’ in M. Woodmansee & P. Jaszi (eds), The Construction of Authorship: Textual Appropriation in Law and Literature: Duke University Press. more…

Javorcik, B. S. (2004). ‘The composition of foreign direct investment and protection of intellectual property rights: Evidence from transition economies’, European Economic Review, 48(1), 39-62.

Johns, A. (2006). ‘Intellectual property and the nature of science’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 145-164. more…

Johns, A. (December 2004). Irish piracy and the English Market, The History of Books and Intellectual History. Princeton University. more…

Johns, A. (2002). ‘Pop music pirate hunters’, Daedalus, 131(2), 67(11). more…

Johnson, W. R. (1985). ‘The Economics of Copying’, Journal of Political Economy, 93(1), 158-174. Stable URL more…

Jones, S. (2006). ‘Reality (c) and virtual reality (c) – When virtual and real worlds collide’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 211-226. more…

Judge, C. B. (1934). Elizabethan book-pirates. Cambridge,: Harvard university press. more…

Kalaycioglu, S., & Rittersberger-Tilic, H. (2000). ‘Intergenerational solidarity networks of instrumental and cultural transfers within migrant families in Turkey’, Ageing and Society, 20, 523-542.

Kant, I. (1785). ‘Of the Injustice of Counterfeiting Books’ in Essays and Treatises on Moral, Political, and Various Philosophical Subjects. London. more…

Khan, B. Z. (January 2004). DOES COPYRIGHT PIRACY PAY? THE EFFECTS OF U.S. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAWS ON THE MARKET FOR BOOKS, 1790- 920, NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES. Cambridge, MA: NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. more…

Khan, B. Z. (February 19, 2006. ). ‘An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States’ in R. Whaples (ed), EH.Net Encyclopedia. more…

King, S. P., & Lampe, R. (2003). ‘Network externalities, price discrimination and profitable piracy’, Information Economics and Policy, 15(3), 271-290. more…

Kitch, E. W. (2000). ‘Elementary and persistent errors in the economic analysis of intellectual property’, Vanderbilt Law Review, 53(6), 1727-1741. more…

Klamer, A. (1996). The value of culture : on the relationship between economics and arts. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. Stable URL

Klein, B., Lerner, A. V., & Murphy, K. M. (2002). ‘The economics of copyright “fair use” in a networked world’, American Economic Review, 92(2), 205-208. more…

Koelman, K. J. Copyright Law & Economics in the Copyright Directive: Is the Droit d’Auteur Passe?: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Kritikos, A., & Bolle, F. (2004). ‘Punishment as a public good. When should monopolists care about a consumer boycott?’ Journal of Economic Psychology, 25(3), 355-372.

Landes, W. M., & Posner, R. A. (1989). ‘An Economic Analysis of Copyright Law’, The Journal of Legal Studies, 18(2), 325-363. Stable URL more…

Landes, W. M., & Posner, R. A. (1989). ‘An Economic-Analysis of Copyright Law’, Journal of Legal Studies, 18(2), 325-363.

Landes, W. M., & Posner, R. A. (2003). The economic structure of intellectual property law. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. more…

Lange, D. M. (2003). ‘Reimagining the public domain. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 463(421). more…

Leach, J. (2005). ‘Modes of creativity and the register of ownership’, pp. x, 345 p in R. A. Ghosh (ed), CODE : collaborative ownership and the digital economy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press. more…

Lee, T. B. (March 21, 2006). Circumventing Competition: The Perverse Consequences of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Policy Analysis (Vol. 564). Stable URL more…

Lemley, M. A. (1997). ‘The economics of improvement in intellectual property law’, Texas Law Review, 75(5), 989-1084.

Lemley, M. A., & McGowan, D. (1998). ‘Legal implications of network economic effects’, California Law Review, 86(3), 479-611.

Lessig, L. (1999). Code and other laws of cyberspace. New York: Basic Books.

Lessig, L. (2001). The Future of ideas : the fate of the commons in a connected world. New York: Random House.

Lessig, L. (2004). Free culture : how big media uses technology and the law to lock down culture and control creativity. New York: Penguin Press.

Leyshon, A. (2003). ‘Scary monsters? Software formats, peer-to-peer networks, and the spectre of the gift’, Environment and Planning D-Society & Space, 21(5), 533-558.

Liebowitz, S. J. (1985). ‘Copying and Indirect Appropriability: Photocopying of Journals’, Journal of Political Economy, 93(5), 945-957. Stable URL more…

Liebowitz, S. J. (2006). ‘File Sharing: Creative Destruction or Just Plain Destruction?’ Journal of Law & Economics, 49(1), 1-28. Stable URL more…

Liebowitz, S. J., & Watt, R. (2006). ‘How to best ensure remuneration for creators in the market for music? Copyright and its alternatives’, Journal of Economic Surveys, 20(4), 513-545. more…

Locke, J. Second Treatise of Government. more…

MacDonald, G. M. (1988). ‘The economics of rising stars’, American Economic Review, v78(n1), p155(112). more…

Madow, M. (1993). ‘Private ownership of public image: popular culture and publicity rights’, California Law Review, 81(n1), 125-240. more…

Malm, K., & Wallis, R. (1992). Media policy and music activity. London ; New York: Routledge. Stable URL more…

Marinova, D., & Raven, M. (2006). ‘Indigenous knowledge and intellectual property: A sustainability agenda’, Journal of Economic Surveys, 20(4), 587-605. more…

Marshall, L. (2004). ‘The effects of piracy upon the music industry: a case study of bootlegging’, Media Culture & Society, 26(2), 163-+.

Martin, P., & Patrick, W. (2004). An Economist’s Guide to Digital Music, CESifo Working Paper (Vol. 1333): CESifo GmbH. Stable URL more…

Maskus, K. E. (2000). ‘Lessons from studying the international economics of intellectual property rights’, Vanderbilt Law Review, 53(6), 2219-2239. more…

Maxwell, T. A. (August 2004). ‘Is copyright necessary?’ First Monday, 9(9), URL (consulted Retrieved Date) Stable URL more…

McCracken, M. L. (1943). Henry Hills, Pirate Publisher: the Significance of His Pamphlets, with a Bibliography (Vol. doctoral dissertation): University of Texas. Stable URL more…

Merryman, J. H. (1989). ‘The Public-Interest in Cultural Property’, California Law Review, 77(2), 339-364. more…

Miceli, T. J., & Adelstein, R. P. (2006). ‘An economic model of fair use’, Information Economics and Policy, 18(4), 359-373.

Michael, P. (2003). ‘The Weakness in Strong Intellectual Property Rights’, Challenge, 46(6), 32-61. Stable URL more…

Michele, B., & David, K. L. (2004). IER Lawrence Klein Lecture: the case against intellectual monopoly: Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Stable URL more…

Miege, B. (1987). ‘The logics at work in the new cultural industries’, Media Culture Society, 9(3), 273-289. Stable URL more…

Mikszáth, K. (1874). Az írói tulajdonról, Nógrádi Lapok (Vol. 44-52). more…

Miyagawa, E. (2001). ‘Locating libraries on a street’, Social Choice and Welfare, 18(3), 527-541.

Myers, F. (2005). ‘Some properties of culture and persons’, pp. x, 345 p in R. A. Ghosh (ed), CODE : collaborative ownership and the digital economy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press. more…

Nadel, M. S. How Current Copyright Law Discourages Creative Output: The Overlooked Impact of Marketing: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Nadel, M. S. (2003). Questioning The Economic Justification For Copyright, SERCI Working Papers: Society for Economic Research on Copyright Issues. more…

Nash, N. F. (1982). ‘English Licenses to Print and Grants of Copyright in the 1640s’, Library, s6-IV(2), 174-184. Stable URL more…

National Research Council (U.S.). NII 2000 Steering Committee. (1997). The unpredictable certainty : information infrastructure through 2000 : white papers. Washington, D.C: National Academy Press. Stable URL

Netanel, N. W. Impose a Noncommercial Use Levy to Allow Free Peer-to-Peer File Sharing: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Newman, J. O. (1985). ‘The Word Made Print: Luther’s 1522 New Testament in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction’, Representations(11), 95-133. Stable URL more…

Nguyen, X. T. N., & Maine, J. A. (2004). ‘Taxing the new intellectual property right’, Hastings Law Journal, 56(1), 1-+.

Nichols, B. (October 2004). Artist Employment In 2003. In M. Bauerlein (Ed.). Washington, DC: National Endowment for the Arts. more…

Niedermüller, P. (2001). ‘A kultúraközi kommunikációról ‘ in I. Béres & Ö. Horányi (eds), Társadalmi kommunikáció. Budapest: Osiris. Stable URL

Nimmer, D. (2003). ‘”Fairest of them all” and other fairy tales of fair use. (copyright law) (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 263(225). more…

Novos, I. E., & Waldman, M. (1984). ‘The Effects of Increased Copyright Protection: An Analytic Approach’, The Journal of Political Economy, 92(2), 236-246. Stable URL more…

Novos, I. E., & Waldman, M. (1987). ‘The Emergence of Copying Technologies – What Have We Learned’, Contemporary Policy Issues, 5(3), 34-45. more…

Oberholzer-Gee, F., & Strumpf, K. (2007). ‘The effect of file sharing on record sales: An empirical analysis’, Journal of Political Economy, 115(1), 1-42. more…

Oksanen, V., & Välimäki, M. (2/2005). ‘Copyright Levies as an Alternative Compensation Method for Recording Artists and Technological Development’, Review of Economic Research on Copyright Issues, 2(2), 25-39. more…

O’Reilly, T. (April 11, 2005). ‘Oops – Only 4% of Titles Are Being Commercially Exploited’, O’Reilly Radar, URL (consulted Retrieved Date) Stable URL more…

p2pnet.net. (2006). Average Simultaneous Global P2P Users 2003-2006. more…

Peitz, M., & Waelbroeck, P. (2006). ‘Piracy of digital products: A critical review of the theoretical literature’, Information Economics and Policy, 18(4), 449-476. more…

Peitz, M., & Waelbroeck, P. (2006). ‘Why the music industry may gain from free downloading – The role of sampling’, International Journal of Industrial Organization, 24(5), 907-913. more…

Pessach, G. (2003). ‘Copyright law as a silencing restriction on noninfringing materials: Unveiling the scope of copyright’s diversity externalities’, Southern California Law Review, 76(5), 1067-1104.

Peterson, R. A., & Berger, D. G. (1975). ‘Cycles in Symbol Production – Case of Popular Music’, American Sociological Review, 40(2), 158-173. more…

Picard, R. G. (2004). ‘A note on economic losses due to theft, infringement, and piracy of protected works’, Journal of Media Economics, 17(3), 207-217. more…

Picker, R. C. (2002). Copyright as Entry Policy: The Case of Digital Distribution: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Plant, M. (1939). The English book trade; an economic history of the making and sale of books. London,: G. Allen & Unwin ltd. more…

Plant, M. (1974). The English book trade : an economic history of the making and sale of books. London: Allen & Unwin.

Pollard, A. W. (1916). ‘THE REGULATION OF THE BOOK TRADE IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY’, Library, s3-VII(25), 18-43. Stable URL more…

Pollard, A. W. (1917). Shakespeare’s fight with the pirates and the problems of the transmission of his text. London: A Moring.

Pollard, A. W. (1920). Shakespeare’s fight with the pirates and the problems of the transmission of his text. Cambridge [Eng.]: The University Press. more…

Pollard, A. W. (1922). ‘SOME NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF COPYRIGHT IN ENGLAND, 1662-1774’, Library, s4-III(2), 97-114. Stable URL more…

Posner, R. A. (2002). ‘The law & economics of intellectual property’, Daedalus, 131(2), 5(8).

Pouwelse, J. A., Garbacki, P., Epema, D. H. J., & Sips, H. J. (2005). The Bittorrent P2P File-sharing System: Measurements and Analysis, 4th Int’l Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems (IPTPS) (Vol. 3640): LNCS. more…

Rai, A. K., & Eisenberg, R. S. (2003). ‘Bayh-Dole reform and the progress of biomedicine. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 289(226). more…

Redmond, D. A. (1990). Sherlock Holmes among the pirates : copyright and Conan Doyle in America 1890-1930. New York: Greenwood Press. more…

Rees, E., & Morgan, G. (1979). ‘Welsh Almanacks, 1680-1835: Problems of Piracy’, Library, s6-I(2), 144-163. Stable URL

Reese, R. A. The First Sale Doctrine in the Era of Digital Networks: SSRN. Stable URL more…

Reichman, J. H., & Uhlir, P. F. (2003). ‘A contractually reconstructed research commons for scientific data in a highly protectionist intellectual property environment.(Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 315(148). more…

Richardson, R. S., & Gaisford, J. D. (1996). ‘North-South disputes over the protection of intellectual property. (developed and developing countries)’, Canadian Journal of Economics, v29(nSPEISS), pS376(376). more…

Rob, R., & Waldfogel, J. (2006). ‘Piracy on the high C’s: Music downloading, sales displacement, and social welfare in a sample of college students’, Journal of Law & Economics, 49(1), 29-62. more…

Rochelandet, F. (2005). ‘Unauthorised sharing through P2P networks: A digital pollution?’ Journal of Network Industries, 5(1), 25-45. more…

Rochelandet, F., Le Guel, F., Bazot, A., & Dourgnon, J. The Copying Practices Of French Internet Users: An Economic Analysis (pp. 37). Paris: ADIS-Robinson; UFC Que Choisir. more…

Rodman, G. B., & Vanderdonckt, C. (2006). ‘Music for nothing or, I want my mp3 – The regulation and recirculation of affect’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 245-261. more…

Rose, C. M. (2003). ‘Romans, roads, and romantic creators: traditions of public property in the information age. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 89(22). more…

Rose, M. (1988). ‘The Author as Proprietor, Donaldson-V-Becket and the Genealogy of Modern Authorship’, Representations(23), 51-85. more…

Rose, M. (1993). Authors and owners : the invention of copyright. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. more…

Rose, M. (2003). ‘Nine-tenths of the law: the English copyright debates and the rhetoric of the public domain. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 75(13). more…

Rosen, S. (1981). ‘The Economics of Superstars’, American Economic Review, 71(5), 845-858. more…

Ruccio, D., Graham, J., & Amariglio, J. (1996). ‘”The Good, the Bad and the Different”: Reflections on Economic and Aesthetic Value’, pp. 56-77 in A. Klamer (ed), The value of culture : on the relationship between economics and arts. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. Stable URL more…

Samuelson, P. (2003). ‘Mapping the digital public domain: threats and opportunities. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 147(125). more…

Sanjek, D. (2006). ‘Ridiculing the ‘White Bread Ooriginal’ – The politics of parody and preservation of greatness in Luther Campbell a.k.a. Luke Skyywalker et al. v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc.’ Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 262-281. more…

Saunders, D. (1992). Authorship and copyright. London ;: Routledge. more…

Schultz, J. (2002). The Myth of the 1976 Copyright “Chaos” Theory. more…

Schultz, M. F. ‘Fear and Norms and Rock & Roll: What Jambands Can Teach Us about Persuading People to Obey Copyright Law’. Stable URL more…

Schultz, M. F. (2006). ‘Copynorms: Copyright and Social Norms’. Stable URL more…

Scotchmer, S. (2004). ‘The political economy of intellectual property treaties’, Journal of Law Economics & Organization, 20(2), 415-437. more…

Scott, K. (1998). ‘Authorship, the Academie, and the Market in Early Modern France’, Oxford Art Journal, 21(1), 29-41. Stable URL more…

Shapiro, C., & Varian, H. R. (1998). ‘Versioning: The smart way to sell information’, Harvard Business Review, 76(6), 106-+.

Slive, J., & Bernhardt, D. (1998). ‘Pirated for Profit’, The Canadian Journal of Economics / Revue canadienne d’Economique, 31(4), 886-899. Stable URL more…

Smiers, J. (2000). ‘The Abolition of Copyright: Better for Artists, Third World Countries and the Public Domain’, International Communication Gazette, 62(5), 379-406. Stable URL more…

Sobek, O. (1992). ‘Alternative Ways in Financing Public-Goods and Services’, Ekonomicky Casopis, 40(1), 24-39.

Solly, E. (1885). ‘Henry Hills, the Pirate Printer’, Antiquary, xi, 151-154. more…

SPEDIDAM. (Mars 2006). La licence globale optionnelle: SPEDIDAM. more…

Standage, T. (1998). The Victorian Internet : the remarkable story of the telegraph and the nineteenth century*s on-line pioneers. New York: Walker and Co. more…

Standage, T. (1998). The Victorian Internet : the remarkable story of the telegraph and the nineteenth centuryŽs on-line pioneers. New York: Walker and Co.

Strahilevitz, L. J. (2003). ‘Charismatic code, social norms, and the emergence of cooperation on the fileswapping networks’, Virginia Law Review, 89(3), 505-595. more…

Streeter, T. (1994). ‘Broadcast Copyright and the Bureaucratization of Property’ in M. Woodmansee & P. Jaszi (eds), The Construction of Authorship: Textual Appropriation in Law and Literature: Duke University Press. more…

Striphas, T., & McLeod, K. (2006). ‘Strategic improprieties: Cultural studies, the everyday, and the politics of intellectual properties’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 119-144. more…

Sunstein, C. R., & Ullmann-Margalit, E. (2001). ‘Solidarity goods’, Journal of Political Philosophy, 9(2), 129-149. more…

Takeyama, L., Gordon, W. J., & Towse, R. (2005). Developments in the economics of copyright : research and analysis. Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Takeyama, L. N. (1994). ‘The Welfare Implications of Unauthorized Reproduction of Intellectual Property in the Presence of Demand Network Externalities’, Journal of Industrial Economics, 42(2), 155-166. more…

Thomas, M. (1994). ‘Reading and Writing the Renaissance Commonplace Book: A Question of Authorship?’ in M. Woodmansee & P. Jaszi (eds), The Construction of Authorship: Textual Appropriation in Law and Literature: Duke University Press. more…

Throsby, D. (2003). ‘Determining the Value of Cultural Goods: How Much (or How Little) Does Contingent Valuation Tell Us?(Author abstract)’, Journal of Cultural Economics, 27(3-4), 275(211). more…

Toldy (Schedel), F. (1838). ‘Néhány szó az írói tulajdonról’, Athenaeum, 705-717. more…

Torrubia, A., Mora, F. J., & Marti, L. (2001). ‘Cryptography regulations for e-commerce and digital rights management.’ Computers & Security, 20(8), 724-738.

Torsson, P., & Fleischer, R. (2005). The Grey Commons, 22C3. Berlin.

Towse, R. (2002). Copyright in the cultural industries. Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar.

Towse, R. (2006). ‘Copyright and artists: A view from cultural economics’, Journal of Economic Surveys, 20(4), 567-585.

Tuckman, H. P., & Leahey, J. (1975). ‘What Is an Article Worth?’ The Journal of Political Economy, 83(5), 951-968. Stable URL more…

Turner, F. (2006). From counterculture to cyberculture : Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the rise of digital utopianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Stable URL

Tushnet, R. (2006). ‘My library: Copyright and the role of institutions in a peer-to-peer world’, Ucla Law Review, 54(4), 977-1029. more…

Van Alstyne, W. W. (2003). ‘Reconciling what the First Amendment forbids with what the Copyright Clause permits: a summary explanation and review. (Conference on the Public Domain)’, Law and Contemporary Problems, 225(213). more…

Varian, H. ‘Pricing information goods’, H. R. Varian, Pricing information goods, available at hhttp://www.sims.berkeley.edu/¸hal/people/hal/papers.html citeseer.ist.psu.edu/varian95pricing.html more…

Wallis, R., & Malm, K. (1984). Big sounds from small peoples : the music industry in small countries. N[ew] Y[ork], NY: Pendragon Press. more…

Wark, M. (2006). ‘Information wants to be free (but is everywhere in chains)’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 165-183. more…

Watt, R. (2000). Copyright and economic theory : friends or foes? Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA, USA: E Elgar.

Weinreb, L. L. (1997-1998). ‘Copyright for Functional Expression’, Harvard Law Review, 111. more…

Wirten, E. H. (2006). ‘Out of sight and out of mind – On the cultural hegemony of intellectual property (critique)’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 282-291. more…

Withers, K. (February 2006). Intellectual Property and the Knowledge Economy, Intellectual Property and the Public Sphere: Balancing Competing Priorities. London: Institute for Public Policy Research. more…

Wittmann, R. (December 2004). Viennese and South German Pirates and the German Market, The History of Books and Intellectual History. Princeton University. more…

Woodmansee, M. (1984). ‘The Genius and the Copyright: Economic and Legal Conditions of the Emergence of the ‘Author”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, 17(4), 425-448. Stable URL more…

Woodmansee, M. (1994). The author, art, and the market : rereading the history of aesthetics. New York: Columbia University Press. more…

Woodmansee, M. (1994). ‘On the ‘Author Effect’: Recovering Collectivity’ in M. Woodmansee & P. Jaszi (eds), The Construction of Authorship: Textual Appropriation in Law and Literature: Duke University Press. more…

Woodmansee, M. (2000). ‘The Cultural Work of Copyright: Legislating Authorship in Britain, 1837–1842 ‘ in Law in the domains of culture University of Michigan Press. more…

Woodmansee, M., & Jaszi, P. D. B. (1994). The Construction of authorship : textual appropriation in law and literature. Durham: Duke University Press.

Zentner, A. (2006). ‘Measuring the Effect of File Sharing on Music Purchases’, Journal of Law & Economics, 49(1), 63-90. Stable URL more…

Zimmermann, P. R. (2006). ‘Just Say No – Negativland’s No Business’, Cultural Studies, 20(2-3), 316-322. more…

When it comes to the market of digital goods, clubs –buyers teaming up to buy a single item and share it among themselves– seem to have little or no economic significance. Digital files
are either perfectly controlled, thus the producer can appropriate all of the consumer surplus
that could have arose by forming a club, or there is no way to control unauthorized copying
thus there is no price at which it would be reasonable to sell a good on the market.
But if we include other, noneconomic aspects of clubs, notably their ability to negotiate and
enforce norms on how a given good is accessed and used, clubs can have a significant effect
on markets. So far we have seen that technological protection measures and copyright laws
cannot effectively curb unauthorized uses of digital content. User communities around
jambands can be an exception from this general trend as together with the artists they have
created a normative environment that is able to police and enforce undesirable actions.
Is there a way to propagate the emergence of such communities through adequate
technologies designed to connect artists and fans? What can we do to help fans and artists to negotiate rules they are both are happy with?

club_model_proposal.pdf

Ha harminc évvel ezelőtt megkérdezték volna tőlem, hogy mi lesz velem, mit fogok csinálni a 61. születésnapomon, azaz ma, sok mindent jósoltam volna, unokákat, Balatont, talán halált is, de soha nem jutott volna eszembe, hogy egy börtönben fogom egyedül, naplóírással töltetni az ünnepet. Börtönben, szerzői jogsértésért, réges-régi zenék és filmek engedély nélküli birtoklásáért, használatáért.

Ha harminc évvel ezelőtt megkérdezték volna tőlem, hogy milyen lesz harminc év multán a szerzői jogi szabályozás, sok mindent jósoltam volna, de az talán utoljára jutott volna eszembe, hogy ennyi év elteltével is pontosan azokat a harcokat fogjuk vívni, amit az ezredforduló első éveiben.

Talán azt jósoltam volna, hogy a szűkösségre építő szerzői jogi rendszer egy évtizeden belül összeomlik. Azt jósoltam volna, hogy lesz öt kaotikus évünk, amikor tízezrek veszítik el a munkájukat és megélhetésüket, mert a fogyasztókat, akik mindent letöltöttek a megjelenés előtt, már nem lehetett a korábbi ócska trükkökkel becsalni a mozikba, online boltokba, és így nem is adtak ki pénzt olyan élményért, amivel nem voltak előre elégedettek, ne adj isten lelkesek. Kicsúszik tehát a talaj – jósoltam volna – az alól a sok érték- és érdektelen termék alól, amire már a „vége“ felirat utáni másodpercben sem emlékezett senki. Az összeomlásból végül azok kerülnek majd ki nyertesen, akik tudják kiknek alkotnak, akik ismerik és szeretik a közönségük, és akiket ismer és szeret a közönség. Az új bárdok kora –talán valami ilyesmi nevet adtam volna ennek a korszaknak-, ahol a bárdok tértől és időtől független külön kasztot alkotnak, egész életüket arra szánva, hogy fáradhatatlanul róják körbe és újra körbe a földgolyót, meglátogatva minden egyes kocsmát, koncerttermet, arénát, rétet, templomot és utcasarkot, ahol a hívek várják őket. A futószalagon gyártott, gyorsan avuló szavatosságú sztárok helyett a helyi közösségben babonás tisztelettel övezett milliónyi szentet képzeltem volna, akik gyalogtempóban követik a globális médiatérben általuk gerjesztett hullámokat, sem egy héttel korábban, sem egy héttel később megérkezve arra a helyre, ahol a népszerűségük épp a csúcson van.

Valami ilyesmit jósoltam volna, mert akkor még megállíthatatlannak láttam a technológiát. Azt hittem, hogy a régi rend kedvezményezettjei és hívei, a Britney entourage végül föladják, nem akarják végül leforgatni a Rambo 20-at is, hogy hiába lesz minden per, minden rendőri fenyegetés, minden technológiai akadály, a kultúra szabad terjedését végül nem lehet megakadályozni, hogy a védelem mindig feltörhető lesz, hogy a jogi fenyegetettség költsége mindig elenyésző, hogy emiatt aztán csak évek kérdése, hogy elfogyjanak a tartalékok, hogy kivérzik az, amit akkor puszta tartalomipar-ként ismertünk. Azt hittem, hogy van szebb, új világ, csak ki kell várni míg bekövetkezik az elkerülhetetlen.

Meg kell mondanom, nem számítottam arra, hogy ugyan a tartalomipar 2015-re tényleg kimerült a hálószobai kalózokkal vívott közdelemben, és pár éven belül tényleg elfogyott a pénzük, ám voltak olyanok, akik fantáziát láttak a valaha büszke tartalomipar romjaiban, és az eszközeik is megvoltak ahhoz, hogy megtegyék azt, ami a nekik nem sikerült. Őszintén szólva nem láttam meg, hogy az árnyékban ott készülődnek páran, akik pontosan látták már akkor is, hogy hogyan fogják szépen csengő cash-re váltani a maréknyi New Kids on the Block-rajongó kitartó érdeklődését egy rég elfeledett történet iránt. Akkor kellett volna gyanút fognom, amikor a hardware gyártók, na nem a számítógép- és Tv-gyártók, vagy a mobilosok, hanem tudják, azok a szürke zakós, rettenetesen unalmasnak tűnő emberek, mindenféle megjegyezhetetlen és érdektelen cégtől, emberek, akik a hálózat láthatatlan csomópontjain található, a forgalmat rendező gépeket gyártják, na ezek, addig vásárolgatták észrevétlenül saját ügyfeleik, a távközlési szolgáltatók részvényeit, mígnem ők foglalják el az igazgatósági székek többségét. Szinte egyik pillanatról a másikra találtuk magunkat szembe egy beton-tömörségű, súlyú és rugalmasságú monstrummal, ami nem csak a házunkhoz vezető csatornákat ellenőrizte kíméletlenül, de minden odavezető út forgalmát is. Ez a hihetetlen hatalom és cash-flow szépen, apránként felvásárolta az archívumokat, a tönkrement kiadók, stúdiók romjait, s e romokkal a XX. és XXI. század összes alkotásának jogát.

Így utólag visszagondolva, a fordulópontot a spam háború elvesztése jelentette. A harmadik évezred első évtizedének végére a spam olyan méreteket öltött, hogy az emberek bármire, a szó szoros értelmében bármilyen alkura hajlandóak voltak, csak hogy megszabaduljanak a telefonjaikba, headsetjeikbe, személyes képernyőikre szünet nélkül ömlő kéretlen Viagra reklám-áradattól. Az alku ördögi volt, lemondtunk a hálózat semlegességéről, elkezdtünk intelligenciát ültetni a csomópontokba, útakadályokat; hagytuk, mit hagytuk, követeltük, hogy minden egyes küldeményt alaposan vizsgáljanak át, és ha a küldője, tartalma alapján spam-nek bizonyul, szabadítsanak meg tőle, töröljék ki, hogy írmagja se maradjon. Ezen a lejtőn aztán nem volt többé megállás, és ahogy egyre több mindent szűrni kezdtünk, úgy váltak egyre hatalmasabbá azok, akik a kapukat vigyázták, akik a forgalmat felügyelték.

Szóval így állunk most. Az új földesurak belelátnak minden általuk továbbított csomagba (márpedig nincs olyan csomag, ami ne rajtuk menne keresztül) és kíméletlenül kiszámlázzák, ha valami olyasmit találnak, ami esetleg megtalálható az ő archívumaikban is. Márpedig minden megtalálható az archívumaikban, ami a rádió és a mozgókép feltalálása óta létrejött.

Mi maradt meg a Napster által felvillantott korábbi korlátlan szabadságból? Mi maradt a szabad hozzáférésből, a public domainból, a szabad felhasználásból, az ingyenesen elérhető tartalmakból? Sajnos menetközben kiderült, hogy a copyleft licencekkel körbebástyázott, ingyenesen felhasználható, amatőr tartalmakból aligha lehet teljes kultúrát építeni. Az otthon barkácsolt tartalmak igazán értékes, önálló, kreatív részéről kiderült, hogy egyszerűen nem éri meg ingyen osztogatni, ha a hálózat felépítése olyan, hogy könnyen el lehet kérni a pénzt a használatért. Ha az első sláger ingyen is volt, a második album már ritkán volt így hozzáférhető. Alattuk ott volt a számtalan, szabad kultúra licencekkel közzétett, ingyenes, de középszerű tartalom. Eredetinek eredetik annyiban, hogy nem más alkotások remixei, de nem túl érdekesek: kutyák, cicák fényképei, kínrímek, kézi kamerával felvett, életlen, zajos turista-videók, zenekari próbák, iskolai dolgozatok. A maradék, a legnagyobb rész pedig lehet, hogy csak pár másodpercnyi jogvédett zenét tartalmaz, vagy pár kockát egy régi filmből, de mint ilyen illegális, hiszen soha nem kaptunk engedélyt az archívumok használatára. A remix: emlékezés. S mivel remix, ha nem fizetsz: illegális.

Emlékszik még valaki a vándorló kintornásokra és ószeresekre? Ők már régen nincsenek, de vannak mások, akik nagyon hasonlítanak e generációkkal korábban kihalt emberekre, akik időről időre meglátogatnak minket, soha nem tudni mikor jönnek, soha nem jelentik be a jöttüket, de mindig ott van körülöttük egy pár méteres sugarú rádiómező, ami valami földalatti szibériai sufni-üzemben összerakott adóból jön talán, de az is lehet, hogy ők maguk barkácsoltak valamit a szeméttelepeken talált régi wifi adók alkatrészeiből. Akárhogy is, ezek az adók halkan, de szüntelen szórják szerteszét a mellényzsebükben hordott tárolón található kincseket: pornót, Kubrick filmeket, régesrégi Nirvana bootleg koncertfelvételeket, a szomszéd háztömbben felszedett, archívumból dolgozó remixeket, betiltott dokumentumfilmeket, mikor mire van igény, mikor mit tudott összeszedni, mikor mit kapott másoktól az új áruért cserébe. Míg átadod neki a pénzt, a karton cigit, amilyen árat szab épp, addig le is töltődik minden a nadrágja hajtókájába varrt, haja szálai közé rejtett kalóz rádióadóról.

Nem tudni kik ők, nem látjuk kétszer ugyanazt az arcot, néha fiatal, jólöltözött, ingatlanügynök-féle jön, máskor mélyen árkolt arcú hontalan, akinek a bőrén barnás csíkokat hagyott az utca mocska, néha a buszon utazva, a tömegben fogható a jel, nem tudni, hogy ki a forrás, honnan szivárognak az illegális tartalmak. Néha nem rádiófelhőben jönnek, hanem fizikai hordozón hozzák az archívumot, a zsebeik tömve vannak memóriakártyákkal, rajtuk rettenetes mennyiségű szemét, de néha egy-egy kincset is találni lehet, legutóbb a teljes SZER archívum volt valamelyik kártyán, de a fizikai hordozó drágább és mivel zsákbamacskát vesz az ember, ezért kockázatosabb is.

Hát itt tartunk most. Az egyik oldalon az égi wurlitzer teljes gőzzel üzemel, semmi nem tilos, de mindennek ára van, nem is kevés. Minden megkezdett felvétel súlyos eurókba kerül, így az ember csendben ül, átteker a reklámblokkokkal szétszaggatott elviselhetetlen csatornákra, vagy reménykedik, hogy megtalálja azt az ingyen kapható tartalmat, ami elég jó ahhoz, hogy holnap már csak pénzért lehessen kapható. Sokan ülünk csendben, arra várva, hogy felbukkanjon egy ismeretlen, akit csak a szeme villanásából ismerünk, és megjöjjenek az archívumi kincsek, az illegális remixek, a bootleg videók.

Én is sokáig ültem csendben. Aztán felkerekedtem magam is. Összeeszkábáltam a magam kis adóját, összeszedtem mindazt, ami az elmúlt évtizedekben poros CD-ken, archivált merevlemezeken, memóriakártyákon összegyűlt, és elkezdtem járni az utcákat. Hamar lebuktam. Tudtam, hogy amit csinálok nem veszélytelen, de azt nem gondoltam volna, hogy még mindig ennyire éber a rendszer.

Így aztán, ha valaki most kérdezné tőlem, hogy mit fogok az elkövetkező harminc évben csinálni, egészen pontosan és részletesen el tudnám mesélni.

(Megjelent a Die Planung No 117, 2036 számában)

HLS: News:

The following op-ed, Protect Harvard from the RIAA, co-written by HLS Professor Charles Nesson ’60 and Wendy Seltzer ’96, a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, was published in The Harvard Crimson on May 1, 2007.

Since its founding, Harvard has been an educational leader. Its 1650 charter broadly conceives its mission to include “the advancement of all good literature, arts, and sciences, [and] the advancement and education of youth in all manner of good literature, arts, and sciences.” From John Harvard’s library through today’s my.harvard.edu, the University has worked to create and spread knowledge, educating citizens within and outside its walls.

Students and faculty use the Internet to gather and share knowledge now more than ever. Law professors at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, for example, have conducted mock trials in the online environment of Second Life; law students have worked with faculty to offer cybercourses to the public at large. Students can collaborate on “wiki” websites, gather research materials from far-flung countries, and create multi-media projects to enhance their learning.

Yet “new deterrence and education initiatives” from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) threaten access to this vibrant resource. The RIAA has already requested that universities serve as conduits for more than 1,200 “pre-litigation letters.” Seeking to outsource its enforcement costs, the RIAA asks universities to point fingers at their students, to filter their Internet access, and to pass along notices of claimed copyright infringement.

But these responses distort the University’s educational mission. They impose financial and non-monetary costs, including compromised student privacy, limited access to genuine educational resources, and restricted opportunities for new creative expression.

One can easily understand why the RIAA wants help from universities in facilitating its enforcement actions against students who download copyrighted music without paying for it. It is easier to litigate against change than to change with it. If the RIAA saw a better way to protect its existing business, it would not be threatening our students, forcing our librarians and administrators to be copyright police, and flooding our courts with lawsuits against relatively defenseless families without lawyers or ready means to pay. We can even understand the attraction of using lawsuits to shore up an aging business model rather than engaging with disruptive technologies and the risks that new business models entail.

But mere understanding is no reason for a university to voluntarily assist the RIAA with its threatening and abusive tactics. Instead, we should be assisting our students both by explaining the law and by resisting the subpoenas that the RIAA serves upon us. We should be deploying our clinical legal student training programs to defend our targeted students. We should be lobbying Congress for a roll back of the draconian copyright law that the copyright industry has forced upon us. Intellectual property can be efficient when its boundaries are relatively self-evident.

But when copyright protection starts requiring the cooperation of uninvolved parties, at the cost of both financial and mission harm, those external costs outweigh its benefits. We need not condone infringement to conclude that 19th- and 20th-century copyright law is poorly suited to promote 21st-century knowledge. The old copyright-business models are inefficient ways to give artists incentives in the new digital environment.

Both law and technology will continue to evolve. And as innovators develop new ways of sharing copyrighted material, the University should engage with both creators and the “fair users” who follow and build upon their works. Finding the right balance will be challenging, but projects such as Noank Media, developed by faculty and fellows at the Berkman Center, provides one glimpse into what the future may hold. Just this year, Noank Media became a functioning international corporation with operations in both China and Canada.

With the goal of fostering “limitless legal content flow” through innovative licensing deals, Noank makes shared music look “free” to its listeners while reimbursing the copyright holders directly for downloads of their materials. Noank does this by serving as an aggregator, collecting payment through institutions such as libraries and schools, as well as Internet Service Providers. Forward-thinking copyright holders recognize that this system may offer them more rewards, not less control.

The University’s educational mission is broader than the RIAA’s demands. We don’t have all the answers either, but rather than capitulating to special interests, we should continue to search for fair solutions that represent the University’s mission, its students, and the law in a way that educates students to be leaders of the digital 21st century.

Wendy M. Seltzer ’96 (HLS ’99) is a Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society. Charles R. Nesson ’60 (HLS ’63) is William F. Weld Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the founder and faculty co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.

I am researching for my talk to be delivered to the International Intellectual Property Program at Chicago-Kent Law School.

This is how I have found what I believe might be the real message of Hollywood to its customers. It is not the oft quoted rant of Jack Valenti about the Boston strangler, but something screenwriters, producers, actors, directors and the rest have to say to the millions of people worldwide.

Perhaps on the rare occasion,
pursuing the right course…
…demands an act of piracy…

Piracy itself can be
the right course?

Excerpt from the movie The Pirates of the Caribbean – The Curse of the Black Pearl.

For the (not so) rare occasions where piracy can be the right course see:
Bodo Balazs: Robin Hood Digital

I had an AHAAA moment last night reading Martha Woodmansee’s „ The Author, Art, and the Market”. She wrote „ As my sketch of writers’ struggles suggests, eighteenth-century Germany found itself in a transitional phase between the limited patronage of an aristocratic age and the democratic patronage of the marketplace. With the growth of a middle class, demand for reading material increased steadily, enticing writers to try to earn a livelihood from the sale of their writings to a buying public. But most were doomed to be disappointed, for the requisite legal, economic, and political arrangements and institutions were not yet in place to support the large number of writers who came forward. What they encountered were the remnants o fan earlier social order.” (p 41-42)

This made me think about the current imbalance between the p2p technologies, the existing intellectual property regimes, and economic frameworks of culture distribution inherited from the period Woodmansee describes. I have always thought of this imbalance as a relationship between law and technology, or economics and technology.

I was wrong.

It is an imbalance between a social practice and a legal-economic framework. Technology has not created that social practice, it simply revealed it, just like a pair of glasses is able to reveal the sharp lines and objects of the world to a short-sighted person. The world, crisp and clear is there, but without the relevant technology we were not able to see, not to mention recognize it.

We should not forget, that p2p file-sharing technology is one of the very few inventions that did not need the slightest effort to propagate it. There was no money and time spent on manufacturing a demand, there was no need to advertise, sell it, no smart campaigns, no exact targeting was needed. It fitted naturally and seamlessly to an existing need in all of us. If this is true, than the question is no longer whether we can bend the technology to the current legal-economic framework, or vice versa, or if there is a compromise between these two. Because one needs to change the underlying social need to curb piracy, the need to have instant access to _everything_, at the lowest price possible, from people who think the same.

Every effort that does not address this need is doomed to fail: if you take away the glasses from someone who had the few moments of clear vision will do everything he can to get out of the blurry shadows again.

Movie Group Claims Win in Chinese Piracy – Breaking – Technology – smh.com.au

A Beijing court has ordered the popular Chinese Web portal
Sohu.com to pay $140,000 in damages for distributing Hollywood
movies online without permission, the movie industry’s trade group
said Friday.

China is regarded as the world’s leading source of illegally copied movies, software and other goods, despite repeated government promises to stamp out the underground industry. The MPA blames piracy in China for costing U.S. studios $244 million in lost box office revenues last year.

The group says Chinese regulators are encouraging a market for pirated movies by allowing only a few dozen foreign titles per year for theatrical release. It said five of the 10 movies cited in its lawsuit against Sohu were not released theatrically in China.

Here I collect the texts I have written as part of the research:

The Club model of cultural consumption and distribution

When it comes to the market of digital goods, clubs –buyers teaming up to buy a single item and share it among themselves– seem to have little or no economic significance. Digital files are either perfectly controlled, thus the producer can appropriate all of the consumer surplus that could have arose by forming a club, or there is no way to control unauthorized copying thus there is no price at which it would be reasonable to sell a good on the market.
But if we include other, noneconomic aspects of clubs, notably their ability to negotiate and
enforce norms on how a given good is accessed and used, clubs can have a significant effect
on markets. So far we have seen that technological protection measures and copyright laws cannot effectively curb unauthorized uses of digital content. User communities around jambands can be an exception from this general trend as together with the artists they have created a normative environment that is able to police and enforce undesirable actions.

Is there a way to propagate the emergence of such communities through adequate
technologies designed to connect artists and fans? What can we do to help fans and artists to negotiate rules they are both are happy with?

Bodó Balázs- Gyenge Anikó: A könyvtári kölcsönzések után fizetendő jogdíj közgazdasági
szempontú elemzése

A nyilvános könyvtári kölcsönzések után a jogosultaknak fizetendő jogdíj (Public Lending
Right – a továbbiakban PLR) ötlete több sebből is vérzik.
Ha a PLR-re mint a nemzeti kulturális politikától független eszközre tekintünk, mely e jogot természetjogi érveléssel a tulajdonhoz való jogból vezeti le, minden esetben oda jutunk, hogy a jogosultak monopoljogát kiterjesztjük és az ezzel járó járadékot növeljük. Ennek következménye jelentős fogyasztói csoportok kulturális fogyasztásból való kiszorulása lehet, melyre eddig a legolcsóbb és hatékonyabb megoldás a könyvtári kölcsönzés szabadsága volt.

Ha a PLR nemzeti kultúrpolitikai eszköz, akkor viszont azt a megállapítást tehetjük, hogy a PLR a meglévő kultúratámogatási rendszerek mellett való üzemeltetése indokolatlanul
bonyolult, és költséges, és ha az állami döntéshozók úgy találják, hogy van a költségvetésben kultúratámogatásra fordítható tartalék, akkor azt érdemes a meglévő intézményrendszeren keresztül szétosztani.

Végül pedig a jogosultak, szerzők szemszögéből megvizsgálva a kérdést: nincs olyan szerző a földön, aki visszavonná egy megjelent művét a könyvtárakból csak azért mert azt vélelmezi, hogy a kölcsönzések miatt eladásoktól esik el. Ennek az egyetlen oka az, hogy a szerzők számára a könyvtárban való jelenlét haszna nagyobb, mint a könyvtári olvasók által okozott kiesett kereslet. Már csak emiatt sem érdemes a PLR bevezetése.

The Pirates of The Pirates of the Caribbean

This is the PowerPoint presentation of the talk I gave on the Chicago Kent Law School this March.

Robin Hood Digital – english

“File-sharing communities are also remembering communities. They direct attention and thus demand, they discuss and thus keep alive cultural goods. When something is posted as available for download, not only those fetch it have requested a particular item, but also those who were standing nearby. These individuals are reciting work long forgotten like those who in Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 memorize books to be able to share them with others.”

Sobri Joska Digital – in hungarian

Megjelent a Café Babel 2006 decemberi, Hiány c. számában.

A Csendes Könyvtár és az összes többi hasonló szolgáltatás az úgynevezett közjavakra épülő internetes kooperációs hálózatokra (commons based peer production networks) példa. A piac által (kényszerűségből) szabadon hagyott résekben, marginális igények, érdekek körül a semmiből jönnek létre olyan közösségek, melyek a hálózat tagjai között elosztott különböző képességeket, erőforrásokat (időt, szkennert, karakterfelismerő programot, korrektúrázó képességet) képesek hatékonyan összehangolni egy olyan feladat érdekében, melynek gyümölcseit aztán mindenki szabadon és ingyenesen élvezheti.”

A szerzői jog gazdaságtana az online világban

Frissen elkészült könyvfejezet.

“A szerzői jog közgazdasági elemzése során a szerzőknek biztosított monopoljog különös figyelmet vívott ki magának. Ennek az az oka, hogy a monopol helyzetben levő termelők maguk határozzák meg a piaci árat, és ez az ár jellemzően nagyobb, mint amennyi versenyhelyzetben lenne. Tökéletes verseny esetén a piaci ár megegyezik a termék határköltségével, azaz azzal az összeggel, amennyibe a legutolsó példány elkészítése kerül. A monopóliumok határköltségnél magasabb ára azzal jár, hogy a piaci kereslet egy
része nem tudja megfizetni a monopolista szabta árat.”

A szőnyeg alá söpört archívum
Megjelent a Manager Magazin 2006. Decemberi számában Tartalomraktárak címen.

“Ma Magyarországon az a kérdés, hogy a piacra várnunk-e, hogy ezeket az archívumokat kiépítsék, a nehézkesen működő és alulfinanszírozott közintézményekre lőcsöljük-e ezt a feladatot, vagy megteremtjük annak lehetőségét, hogy a magyar kulturális közösség fenntartsa önmagát. A Neumann-ház megrendelésére elkészített Nemzeti Digitális Adattár 2.0 vitaanyag a közösségi archiválás lehetőségének kiterjesztését tartalmazza, az első lépés tehát ezügyben megtörtént. Még egy lépés azonban hátra van. Dekriminalizálni kellene kirillt, scan_dalt, helpert és társaik. Hogy ne fordulhasson elő az, hogy ennek az örökségnek piaci, személyes érdekeket sértő részei esetleg nem maradnak fenn. Hogy ne legyen bűnöző az a soktízezres közösség, amelyik a magyar audiovizuális örökség archiválásán dolgozik – társadalmi munkában.”

A retardált archívum

Megjelent az Élet és Irodalom 2007. január 5-i számában.

“A közpénzből finanszírozott, közszolgálati archívum kapuit minél szélesebbre kell tárni. A hat havi elérhetőséget nem szűkíteni kell, hanem az archívum digitalizálásával bővíteni. Az archívumi anyagok lementését, felhasználását, adott esetben átalakítását nem megakadályozni kell hanem a megfelelő jogi konstrukció kidolgozásával megengedni , támogatni, bátorítani. Ezt követeli a finanszírozás módja. Ezt követeli a közszolgálatiság jelentése. Ezt követeli a piaci értékesítés igénye. Ezt követeli a józan ész.”
PhD 2-page research proposal in english

A short description of my research.

Régebbi cikkek/ older writings

A „mély link”
Internetes tartalomszolgáltatók vs. internet

Megjelent a Beszélő 2003 szeptemberi számában.

“Mély link valójában nincs. Link van, mely mutathat bárhová: egy portál címoldalára, a legutolsó, senki által nem olvasott cikkére, képre, linkgyűjteményre, bárhova. A mély linkelést nem lehet megtiltani, csupán azt lehet technológiai eszközökkel elérni, hogy egy adott gyűjteménybe csak egy, a hivatalos kapun keresztül lehessen bejutni. Ott pedig, ahol korábban szabad volt az átjárás, jogi vagy technológiai falak kezdenek épülni, melyek az internet mindent mindennel összekötő hipertextuális szövetéből kiragadnak, elérhetetlenné tesznek tartalmakat. Az intertextualitásból kiemelt, a többi szöveggel való kapcsolatától megfosztott valami pedig megszűnik szövegnek lenni.”

Bolyongás egy áldás nélküli térben
Graffiti és street art mint a társadalmi diskurzus eszköze

Megjelent a Café Babelben 2004-ben.

“Az egyre lezáródó fizikai, média- és kulturális terekben az autonómia megteremtése egyre költségesebb: magas a lebukás veszélye és nagy a várható büntetés, megfizethetetlenek a kártérítési és nem utolsó sorban jogi költségek. Nehéz felbecsülni, hogy az egyre szigorodó ellenőrzési technikák milyen mértékben gátolják üzenetek megjelenését, hiszen a leginkább kockázatvállalókat kivéve az alkotóknak nem áll érdekükben láthatóvá válni, nem szeretnék magukra felhívni a figyelmet. Ha mégis, akkor a szólás szabadságát keresők szükségszerűen mozognak a gyengébb ellenállás, tehát olyan médiumok felé, melyek könnyebben támadhatók, azaz ellenőrzésük architekturális okokból nehezebben megoldható”

This is my schedule for Spring/Summer 2007:

March 21: Tim Holbrook invited me to give a talk at the Chicago-Kent Law School International Intellectual Property Program. I will speak about “The pirates of the Pirates of the Caribbean – what can we learn from file-sharers”

March 26-29: I will try to go to the O’reilly Emerging Tech Conference, San Diego, as I have a pass. I hope I can fit that in.

April 12-15: Fulbright Enrichment Seminar, San Antonio, TX

April 27-29: Iain Boal of Retort has invited me to participate in a panel at the “Crisis of the Commons in California” Conference. Though the commons in California is not exactly my filed of research, underground commons is, and this idea has captured Iain’s imagination.

May 18: My paper was accepted to the ‘Communication Technologies of Empowerment’ Conference organized by Institute of Communications Studies at the University of Leeds

May 24-27: My submission was accepted for the International Communication Association‘s 2007 Conference . I will talk at the “File-sharing, The Music Industry and the New Economy” session.

June 16-19: ICommons meeting in Dubrovnik, Croatia. I am involved in organizing a panel together with Lawrence Liang on piracy.

July 16-27: I was accepted to the Oxford Internet Institute Summer Doctoral Program to be held at Harvard Law School. I am proud and excited.

From experience goods to search goods

There has been several measurements on how illegal downloading affects markets of cultural goods. Although the results sometimes contradict each other, there is a consensus that in fact there is a conversion of illegal downloaders into purchasers. There are several explanations offered: downloaders pay for items they were not exposed to before (the publicity value argument), downloaders are not evil, and they are willing to pay to artists they like (community support argument), downloaders are buying because there is a market they are happy to use or they are threatened to use by lawsuits (industry argument) or illegal downloads are not (good enough) substitutes for a DVD or a CD.

In this essay I would like to offer a different approach that explains the coexistence of illegal downloading and legal purchases by a shift that affects the status of cultural goods. A shift that made culture to act like a search good instead of an experience good, a shift that at the end completely rewrites the rules of cultural markets.

In the economic literature cultural goods are described as experience goods the value of which can only become apparent to its consumer after it has been consumed. Unlike drinking just another bottle of coke, one cannot tell if she liked a concert, a movie or the new album of an artist until she has experienced it. This attribute of cultural goods defines a very special economic context to these goods as this uncertainty on the experience creates a factor of risk on the consumer side, a risk which heavily affects prices and demand for the goods, thus creating a risk for the supply side as well.

There are several methods by which both the consumers and the suppliers try to lower the level of uncertainty on the demand side. On the consumer side listening to word of mouth and peer reviews and the general avoidance of things unheard of and unknown are the tools to reduce the risk of paying for something that might turn up as a bad experience. Suppliers give away free previews in form of trailers, teasers; a whole media system of commercial radio airs these goods in exchange for commercials; professional or paid reviewers are writing about these goods; charts and top-lists are complied; massive multi-million dollar marketing campaigns are launched; stars with known reputation are bred and employed. These techniques are designed to provide the potential consumers with extra information and thus lower their uncertainty.

Today the efforts and resources of cultural industries are equally divided between the production of cultural goods and their marketing. Production costs are in the same range as marketing budgets and the marketing has spawn a distinct culture of celebrities and parasite media dealing with celebrities, reinforced by the cross-ownership of media conglomerates in every media type.

Despite all these efforts consumers might end up not being satisfied. There are several signs of this ‘post-coital sadness’: bad reviews on blogs, quickly dying films after the opening weekend, weak DVD rentals and sales and falling reputation of stars. This signals the distance between the actual and the promised experience, the size of the information asymmetry between the consumer and the supplier.

With the advent of file-sharing technologies this situation has changed. The risk of consuming a cultural good is not a financial risk anymore if one can download a song freely before purchasing it. Of course there are costs still associated with consumption: the cost of acquiring information about a good, the cost of searching, the cost of downloading, the cost of possible lawsuits, etc., but one does not have to pay at the counter only to realize that all the other songs on that album are not at all that good as the one played all the time on the radio, or that the trailer actually contains every enjoyable second of a feature film. Consuming a cultural good for free is the cheapest way to get to know the actual value of it. As the risks of consuming something unknown decrease, cultural goods shift to be search goods in economic terms, as no transaction is takes place before the actual experience.

But that does not mean that market transactions cannot and will not happen afterwards. But in this case a purchase will happen only if the consumer had a positive experience, when she actually had full information on the goods that she was about to purchase.

Will this shift result is a loss in sales? Well, the supplier will lose only the sales that were happening only because the information asymmetry – in other words sales that at the end resulted in an unhappy customer. Will new sales occur? Certainly, from consumers for whom the risk of paying for something unknown was too high of an entry barrier to make the actual purchase in the first place. Illegal downloading is lowering the entry barrier of consumers to markets.

Many still argue that illegal downloading is actually replacing or rather killing markets. I would argue that the efforts trying to keep cultural goods as experience goods are killing markets. Trailers, paid-for radio broadcasts, 30 second online listening-in services do not lower the uncertainty barrier enough to draw significant amount of new customers to markets outside of the mainstream. And for those consumers who are free-riding on this system will eventually face a serious problem: the end of supply of the goods they actually liked but never paid for.